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So I've been at this company for 6 months. New hire. I plan to retire here which is a long way away.

Last week a supervisor from another department came to me wondering if I would be interested in applying for a new role that is 2 grades up to a lead.

My supervisor has been on vacation the past 2 weeks. I have considered it because it's a step up the ladder that I want to climb. But of course this is all talk as of right now. How do I tell my boss that I may consider this job that will be open soon?

  • I plan to retire here which is a long way away. that does not have anything to do with accepting a new role. – Sourav Ghosh Jul 16 at 5:29
  • @SouravGhosh I know many people who decided to stay at a particular level - well below what they were capable of, so that they could just "coast along until retirement" so it does have something to do with accepting a new role for some but not all and may well, rightly, be part of the OP's thinking. – Solar Mike Jul 16 at 6:26
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    The comment on long term plans is relevant, OP doesn't want to burn any bridges in this company. – Alan Dev Jul 16 at 11:30
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It would be best if you could wait for your supervisor to come back from leave before starting any transfer process. If the other supervisor is keen on you, they should be prepared to wait.

When your supervisor gets back, you should ask their permission as a sign of respect before engaging with the other supervisor with regards to a job switch. In a perfect world you wouldn't need to do this, but you all work in the same company, the last thing you want to happen is to create friction. The conversation should start off around your ambitions to grow as an employee.

They may respond in a few different ways:

They may ask you not to apply

Would be unusual, but you can start a discussion with them about how you can satisfy your career objectives. You can, of course, apply anyway.

They give you their blessing

It's full steam ahead

They warn you against the move

You then can work through the different issues with your supervisor and see if the move is still right

They may offer you advancement opportunities within the team

If they understand your ambition, they may open up and advancement oppertunity within your current team. You can then decide if that is right for you.

  • you should ask their permission as a sign of respect upvoted for this, especially given the OP's desire to remain with the company for the long term and not burn bridges. Plus, some employers have policies that you have to ask your current supervisor before applying for other internal roles, so the OP should probably find out if that's the case before proceeding. – dwizum Jul 16 at 13:20
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How do I tell my boss that I may consider this job that will be open soon?

This is a two step process:

  1. Talk to the supervisor who informed / offered you about the role, and gather the requirements and / or prerequisites for the new role.

  2. Analyze the requirements and if you see yourself as a good fit, once your manager is back, invite them to a meeting and discuss with them about the opportunity, the offer and your willingness to move to that role. Then, based on the outcome of the conversation, you can choose the next steps.

However, before you approach your manager, make sure you do the following first. Ask these questions to yourself (and answer honestly):

  • Do you know the roles and responsibilities of the new role?
  • Do you know the required skillset to transition to the new role?
  • Do you know the workflow in the new department and whether that will be suited based on your current work experience / knowledge?

If you're affirmative on the eligibility, and interested in the new role, then, once your supervisor comes back from the leave - schedule a meeting and express your willingness to move to the new role. Be prepared to explain why you think that move would be good for you and the organization.

  • The doesn't answer the question: "How do I tell my boss that I may consider this job that will be open soon?" – Gregory Currie Jul 16 at 5:47
  • @GregoryCurrie as I said, this is a two step process (1) talk to the person offering the new role and gather requirements and eligibility. (2) have a meeting with your manager with that information and willingness. What more is there? – Sourav Ghosh Jul 16 at 5:49
  • 80% of your answer is not answering the question. Maybe move the 20% of your answer that is to the top. – Gregory Currie Jul 16 at 5:56
  • @GregoryCurrie OK, I'll rephrase my answer, if that helps. – Sourav Ghosh Jul 16 at 5:59

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