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I recently received an offer of employment from a potential employer. It was a straight forward (no confusion). I received my offer letter via email and I sent my response back via email accepting it. The potential employer even acknowledged it. Let's say this employer is X.

Here comes the tricky part - I was interviewing with 2 other companies around that time. I told them both that I had an offer on the table (prior to accepting my offer with company X). Let's say these 2 companies are A and B.

Company A: I had finished my interview rounds and was waiting for a final decision. They told me that it would take 1-2 weeks atleast to get back with a decision (even though I told them about X's offer - which makes sense).

Company B: I had 1 last interview pending with some really high people in upper management. I told them about the offer. The recruiter told me that they cannot speed up the processing as a result of me getting the offer and asked me if I want to back out of the interview process. I told them I would back out (having thought it through very carefully!)

The recruiter did come back and acknowledge that I received an offer from another firm and knew that I mostly might be taking it, but was encouraging me to still interview and meet the management about potential roles.

Now I'm confused if I should even meet with them since I already have an offer that I mostly will be accepting. Is it worth to in a long term perspective?

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Completely explore all the available options before committing to one, and choose the one that best aligns with your career goals.

The recruiter did come back and acknowledge that I received an offer from another firm and knew that I mostly might be taking it, but was encouraging me to "STILL INTERVIEW" and meet the management about potential roles.

It's a good advise from the recruiter. Follow it. No harm in exploring a potential opportunity.

You have not started with company X as yet. In your own best interest, it would be wise to explore all the available options and choose the one that best aligns with your career goals.

  • Thank you for your quick answer ! :) – user106876 Jul 16 at 11:01
  • Even after committing I would say follow the process with the other company because until you actually start something can go wrong and an offer can be withdrawn. – Alan Dev Jul 16 at 12:09
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Yes. Doesn't hurt to at least talk. You owe nothing to either employer.

Years ago I had interviewed at a job, and was told by a manager there that they liked me, but couldn't hire me until the owner returned from out of town. Since I did not have a firm offer in hand, I started work at another job. After a week, I got the offer, and he actually offered me more because he knew I was working and I had negotiating power.

Now, working in the US might be different, as I was not required to give notice. I did offer 2 week notice to the one I had just started but they let me go early since I had not been there long.

Now, if you do decide to move, apologize to them for the inconvenience, and express that due to the timing of it all, that's just how it played out.

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There's a lot of subtlety in this subject, and some of it will vary with cultural or job-specific differences. That said, in general, the best rule of thumb is to actively pursue all options until you've made a firm contractual commitment to a new employer.

On the one hand, until you've made a firm commitment, you never know what could happen - a "likely" offer could never materialize, or a background check could cause an offer to be pulled out from under you, or another candidate may accept a position before you. So until you've got a firm, in writing commitment, you should behave as if you are still actively pursuing all possible leads.

But on the other hand, once you've received an offer you're happy with and accepted it, and passed any prerequisites, continuing to interview is really just wasting everyone's time at best, or putting your reputation on the line at worst. Although some people are happy to reject an offer they've accepted and switch employers, or quit after just a few days at a new job, it's generally not good practice - and in some industries and cultures, can effectively get you blacklisted and damage your future career prospects. So - once you've committed, stick with it.

Let's put that in context for your situation. You said,

Now I'm confused if I should even meet with them since I already have an offer that I mostly will be accepting.

Compare that to the rule explained above. You haven't actually accepted the offer, so it makes sense to pursue other opportunities.

  • Is it true the OP hasn't accepted the offer? "I received my offer letter via email and I sent my response back via email accepting it." – thursdaysgeek Jul 16 at 21:33
  • That's a good point, I guess I'd been confused by the last sentence containing "mostly will be" as I interpreted the future tense of "will" to mean that they planned on accepting it but hadn't. – dwizum Jul 17 at 12:45
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I received my offer letter via email and I sent my response back via email accepting it. The potential employer even acknowledged it.

The commonly accepted practice is that merely having an offer does not stop you from interviewing with others, but this is the dividing line: after you have accepted the offer and the potential employer acknowledged it, that's that... you don't keep interviewing elsewhere.

Now, this is not an actual legal requirement. You can keep interviewing and go back on your word, or even leave the new job a few days after starting it - but it will damage your reputation a lot. You won't get into prison for doing it, but in some cases the employer can even sue you for lost time and related expenses, although in most cases they won't bother doing it.

If you decide to do it anyway, make sure that the reward is worth it.

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