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I've been through an exhaustive process in landing a top job. The interview went well but I feel it could have been a bit better.

The Site director gave me his email address and mentioned how I can email him if I have any other queries after the interview.

I was interviewed by 4 directors and each gave me an insight into there function and how it interoperates with IT.

Should I send an email indicating how I can help each director improve certain aspects of their department which they mentioned to me and thank them for interviewing me?

  • That was worded wrong, I should have said the department. I'll edit it. – Jonah Aug 28 '13 at 19:41
  • I remember a job interview where someone wanted a developer to create a new line of business for his company. What he said in the interview was, effectively, that this was to generate the revenue to cover employee health insurance. After the interview concluded I realized he hadn't even mentioned what customers were going to get out of the new line of business and it wasn't clear to me that customers would find anything of value. In retrospect my follow up was probably negative, but it specification mentioned 'the word Customer was never mentioned'. – Meredith Poor Aug 28 '13 at 22:45
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Yes, you absolutely should send a thank-you note to everyone who interviewed you. They spent time and energy on you, and it's courteous to express appreciation. It's also standard practice and therefore may be expected. And, of course, it reflects well on you and re-enforces any positive impression they may have formed about you.

In the thank-you note, it makes sense to re-enforce the basic message that you were trying to convey in the interview: "You should make me an offer." So, saying something like "I think that I would contribute X, Y, and Z to your company, and I look forward to hearing from you." would make sense.

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