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I am a Java developer and I am new to game development.

When I try for write my resume, I am able to write for other project but not able to write for gaming. Actually I don't know what to write and not to write for gaming.

closed as too broad by Jim G., jcmeloni, Michael Grubey, Kate Gregory, CincinnatiProgrammer Sep 2 '13 at 16:22

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  • Have you actually done any projects or work with game development or are just starting out in the field? – Michael Grubey Aug 29 '13 at 7:34
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Your résumé should, as it always does, list your work experience and education.

Now, I assume you got to this point and decided you have a problem - you want to get a job in game development, but you have no work experience and no formal education in that field!

Have you got any non-professional game development experience? Written any small games? Contributed to open-source game projects? If so, put a section in there for "other experience" or some such title, and list this stuff out!

If you don't even have that, well, it's going to be an uphill battle no matter what. In that situation, your résumé is not going to speak for itself, so you're going to need a scintillating cover letter to go along with it. Talk about your passion and enthusiasm for the game development field, talk up whatever general software development skills you have that you think might be useful (team organization experience, software development project management techniques, integrating third-party components, whatever), and hope it gets you into an interview where you can really show your enthusiasm!

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Game development is a term that encompasses a lot of jobs and technologies. Game development companies still have testers, IT, DBAs, QC/QA positions, web designers, graphic artists, technical writers. They work in multiple languages and platforms.

They also have specialized positions music, graphics, engines... But so does any other specialty program type.

Medical software companies have some people that know a lot about medicine, but not everybody has to.

You can work for a spacecraft development company and not be an astronaut.

You can work for a company that develops software for the insurance industry and not be sure about the difference between Whole Life an Universal life.

Your resume should reflect what you have done and what you can do. Apply for jobs with companies that do game development, then later leverage that experience into the job you ultimately want. But don't expect to be able to jump directly to your dream job without either education or experience. So do it in two steps.

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