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Currently I have a steady job at a medium sized company. In this company, I feel valuable and they expect me to stay for the long term.

However, due to my feeling like I am almost reaching the full potential my current company can offer, tomorrow I am attending an interview at a large multinational company. I didn't contact them, since I am currently okay in my position, but since the new company contacted me and I know I will want to make a change sooner or later, I decided to attend the interview.

Given that the position in the new company will be of my liking, but the one I currently have also has its benefits, the main reason to make me change jobs right now would be that the new company wants me there for the long term (at least a few years).

In my country (Spain), companies have a history of hiring you for shorter periods of time (few months) and then get rid of you for someone cheaper to take your place. They usually make short term contracts and after them, they either hire you for a longer time or lay you off, so that is of uttermost importance to me and waiting to see the contract will not be helpful.

I know there are no guarantees, but what questions should I ask or what red flags should I look for in the interview that will give me an idea of what kind of philosophy this company has regarding this topic?

Thank you in advance.

About possible duplicate:
I do not think it is a duplicate. The linked question is quite broad and asks about company culture in general. The answers are quite broad as well and cover things like dress code, laid back attitude and employee interaction. Mine covers how to find out how long the company thinks they will keep you around. Paying attention about the questions that they ask me about my personality or my abilities will not solve this issue.

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    @JoeStrazzere No. Here, companies usually make you a first contract which can have a length of 2-6 months (maybe up to a year), something similar to the probation period that is common in the U.S (they can pay you less). After that is finished is when the problem usually comes in. Many companies just let you go after that. Therefore, asking about that contract will give me an answer such as "six months", but I would like to know what happens after that. If I perform well, I stay, or my performance will not matter, they just want probation period workers? As I said, it is pretty common here. – A.T. Jul 22 at 16:03
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    @gnat I dont think it is a duplicate. The linked question is quite broad and asks about company culture in general. The answers are quite broad as well and cover things like dress code and laid back attitude. Mine covers how to find out how long the company thinks they will keep you around. – A.T. Jul 22 at 16:13
  • If they reached out to you, and you are comfortable in your current job, isn't this the time to buck the system and ask for something better? "My current employment has a contract of 3 years, if you aren't willing to match that, I'm not interested". The company I work at offers 2 weeks vacation by default to new employees, but people abandoning other jobs are often able to negotiate for more. – DragonYen Jul 22 at 17:10
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I know there are no guarantees, but what questions should I ask or what red flags should I look for in the interview that will give me an idea of what kind of philosophy this company has regarding this topic?

Not to be Captain Obvious, but one of the questions I ask when presented the opening to do so is "What is the average tenure of your employees, and in particular, the team I would be joining?"

This is direct, but not rude, and should definitely not be unexpected by the person interviewing you. Don't be surprised if the hiring manager simply recites each team members name along with time of service. That is okay, as it gets you what you are looking for.

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