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I'm getting a new boss (for several unknown reasons I was not promoted to this position, although I have the skills and experience), who does not have any specific experience in the field which he will be responsible for.

My boss's boss told me that I have to support my boss and teach him all the skills and tasks, including all the know-how, which I built and have done over years, so he can be my boss. I have already had several discussions with my boss's boss, but without any resolution or any insight.

Now, I do not want to give all my experience and know-how away and teach him from scratch all the things. First, because I think it is not my job to do this and I do not have the resources and secondly a boss in my view has to bring at least a little bit of a glimpse of the subject for which he is responsible for.

What do you think is a good strategy to handle it to not beeing rude or denying, also regarding daily business and subject specific questions from his side?

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    Have you considered that he is in the poison due to his management experience, rather than subject matter experience? I think it will be tricky for people to answer without a little more information. What will be his actual job day to day? Is he a project manager? Team leader? – Bee Jul 31 at 13:17
  • The case is that I am the only staff besides my boss and "management experience" in this case is not important, at least in my opinion - because he will do some tasks what I have done before. – user107452 Jul 31 at 13:19
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    ""management experience" in this case is not important, at least in my opinion" - maybe in your boss' boss' opinion it is was all I'm trying to point out – Bee Jul 31 at 13:24
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    it is not my job to do this seems contradictory to My boss's boss told me that I have to – dwizum Jul 31 at 13:31
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    @smartwuant Bee is correct: A manager's role and purpose is usually more about enabling their reports to do their actual work, than it is about being as good in their reports' tasks themselves as their reports are. In other words, a good manager will remove any obstacles you encounter while you do your job; but to be able to do this for you, they need at least a basic understanding of your work. – Niko1978 Aug 1 at 13:14
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The world isn't fair. Some people get the job (or get promoted over you) for a myriad of reasons, from being more skilled in something that is necessary for the position, to being better than you at kissing ass.

Sure, the guy has absolutely no clue on how whatever you do works. But why are you so sure that this is the most important skill for this position? Maybe the guy is great at managing people, or planning sprints, or whatever. Being a boss is so much more than having technical knowledge.

Moreover, if your boss (or boss' boss) says you should teach someone about something, that is your job. And I believe you wouldn't be complaining if you were asked to teach an intern or junior colleague. This question (more like a rant) gives me the impression that you are only bitter because you didn't get the promotion.

And that's something you won't change. If you can't live with it, better start looking for a new job.

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    Great answer. Just wanted to add: "If you can't live with it, better start looking for a new job" - where you are likely to start back at square one in terms of being a boss to anyone – Bee Jul 31 at 13:26
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    "if your boss (or boss' boss) says you should teach someone about something, that is your job" That is not how prof. jobs work unless you are working at a poorly ran outfit. – NDEthos Jul 31 at 13:44
  • Largely agreed, but there is a difference between mentoring and being a trainer. We just don't know if it is sour grapes or a role that shouldn't be the OP's. The farther over on the trainer side it goes, the more likely it’s not part of the OP’s responsibility and a potentially iffy career move to take on more and more unrelated job functions. Flexibility can be good, but dilution can be bad. – John Spiegel Jul 31 at 14:42
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I understand that you're disappointed you didn't get the position - and I can sympathize but you're looking at this from the wrong angle.

As things stand now it's a done deal, you didn't get the job and refusing to help the incoming manager get their bearings isn't going to change that. You won't suddenly get offered the job if they can't perform - in fact if they don't perform and it's because you wouldn't help them I imagine that you would be putting your own position in jeopardy!

So you can either be difficult about training them, and be seen as someone who isn't willing to work with a colleague or you can be the new manager's go-to person and really impress with the skills and know-how you've been building up over the years. Neither of these is going to get you this position - it's gone. But which of these approaches do you think is going to put you in a better long-term position, especially if you intend to stay at this organization for the foreseeable future?

Also bear in mind that not all new hires work out - maybe this new manager is useless or moves on (for whatever reason). If that happens you're going to be much, much better placed to put yourself in contention as a co-operative and productive person then as the surly recalcitrant.

Remember also (and this is pretty important) none of this is the incoming manager's fault - they didn't screw you over. They applied for a job and were accepted. That's it. Attempting to "punish" them for that is misguided at best and downright childish and petulant at worst.

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    +1. It sucks to get passed over for a promotion but you can either work with the situation as it stands and try to turn it to your advantage or transfer to a new role. Unless your boss's boss is a total moron, he must have hired this person for a reason. Sometimes a fresh perspective can be incredibly valuable. Maybe start by giving him the benefit of the doubt. You might be pleasantly surprised. – AffableAmbler Jul 31 at 14:58
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    +1, partially for teaching me the word "recalcitrant" wich i will try to use in every coversation henceforth. – monocell Jul 31 at 16:29
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I do not want to give all my experience and know-how away and teach him from scratch all the things.

You can't give away experience. Experience is a matter of reflection of the past.

You can however use your experience to be valuable in this situation. Show that you're capable of transferring your knowledge to help your new boss avoid common pitfalls.

If you're successful then it proves that you're a valuable asset that the company can use in the future, making you a better candidate than others for future promotions. Show that you're someone who can teach and guide.

What do you think is a good strategy to handle it to not beeing rude or denying, also regarding daily business and subject specific questions from his side?

If you deny then you're just asking to be fired. You'll effectively be useless in this whole situation. Withholding information for the benefit of your own over the company is a sign of someone a company does not want to have for the long term, since you don't value the company's best interests.

You don't have to take your new boss into a heavy training session. All you have to do is answer the questions your boss has, help him when he asks for it and give him pointers in where he can improve. He'll appreciate it.

Maybe you can ask for a raise since the training of your new boss is obviously valuable to the company. But even if denied, don't forget that you're helping the person who'll probably have a huge say in your future compensation.

A final note: companies like people who make themselves expendables. They'll be less likely to fire you if you're transferring knowledge and documenting, because it means that your future tasks will be more accessible to future employees.

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