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I was working with a company in NY and took a promotion last year in Chicago. I am trying to move back to NY to be with my fiancé and the job has agreed to transfer me but back into my older position (I will be taking a slight pay decrease and working odd hours). The transfer will not take place until the end of September, and they won’t be paying for my relocation. I had also been interviewing with other companies while waiting to see if this transfer was possible. After finding out about my transfer, I received an offer for a better position, salary and company and don’t know how to go about my resignation. Is it wrong to take this offer when my company agreed to transfer me?

Additionally, I have a vacation planned before I start the new job if I choose to take it. Should I put in 3 weeks notice before my vacation or put in 2 weeks notice when I get back?

Thanks!

  • Did you sign any paperwork related to this transfer? – mhoran_psprep Aug 1 '19 at 21:02
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Is it wrong to take this offer when my company agreed to transfer me?

Not at all. Your company may have agreed to transfer you, but at a cost of a lower salary and working odd hours. Those two factors are less desirable than the better position, salary, and company that your new offer provides in my opinion.

Additionally, I have a vacation planned before I start the new job if I choose to take it. Should I put in 3 weeks notice before my vacation or put in 2 weeks notice when I get back?

Take the vacation and put in the two weeks when you return. A three weeks notice makes little sense if you won't actually be available for the three weeks.

  • Thank you. I know that my location in Chicago has already found a replacement who I was suppose to be training until the end of September. I feel more bad for the position in NY as they are expecting me and could have been interviewing other candidates all along. – winter15 Aug 1 '19 at 18:25
  • @winter15 Don’t. A job is an intersection of best value to both parties. Your current company no longer meets the criteria. It’s not their fault. It’s not your fault. It just is. If they are so dependent upon you that your absence dramatically impacts them, then you are already being taken advantage of and it’s even more reason to leave—no matter how nice they are about it. – John Spiegel Aug 1 '19 at 19:30
  • I agree that giving them two weeks after he returns from vacation is the right thing to do, but I'd say warn them before he leaves for vacation. It doesn't cost him any more to do that than it would after he gets back, and it offers the company more warning – Ben Barden Aug 1 '19 at 20:51
  • @BenBarden - The company could decide to let the author go, when the author notifies them with their intent to leave, after their vacation. Only the author can determine if that is typically what happens at their company when an employee resigns – Donald Aug 2 '19 at 5:31
  • @Ramhound That's true, but from the sounds of things, that's not necessarily a negative for the author. If he passes the word while on his way out the door to his vacation, and then doesn't respond to contact (something one is not required to do when on vacation) then they won't be able to let him go until he gets back. – Ben Barden Aug 2 '19 at 13:03
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IMHO, you should take care of you and your first.

Make your decision mostly based on that, unless your industry is extremely small one and your action may affect your carrier later on

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