0

I'm not a recent graduate, have several years of experience already. I was in a bit of a hard situation, needed a new job quickly. I accepted one and now I discover I'm expected to take over tasks an intern should be doing. They are much too junior, assistant tasks (organizing, bringing, formatting) instead of real skill-oriented tasks and I don't see what I could learn working like that.

One reason why this worries me is that I have heard the company does that to people. (Unfortunately I heard about it after accepting the offer). I know people who changed from Position A in field B at the company to exactly the same Position A in field B at a different company arguing that at least now they really do A in B and not absurd tasks anyone could do.

I'm not sure what the best way to proceed here will be. I've tried offering taking offer more complex tasks but this has been turned down and received badly. The money is ok-ish, it was a compromise on my side. But I don't want to be unemployed.

  • 7
    I don't see what I could learn working like that. while it's good to want to learn, you should keep in mind that most employment arrangements are about an employee doing work and an employer paying them for it - not about learning. – dwizum Aug 21 at 20:43
  • @dwizum, of course, but in jobs that require a M.A. or Ph.D. and several years of experience you don't want your only responsibility to be formatting presentations. Unless you do - but then your employer shouldn't portray the job as sth it's not during the interviews. – user42731 Aug 22 at 16:34
  • Is the new job paid in line with "junior" responsibilities? (you said that you needed a job quickly, so I could see accepting a pay cut/'demotion') or with your actual level of experience? – seventyeightist Aug 22 at 19:21
11

I was in a bit of a hard situation, needed a new job quickly. I accepted one and now I discover I'm expected to take over tasks an intern should be doing. [...]

I'm not sure what the best way to proceed here will be. I've tried offering taking offer more complex tasks but this has been turned down and received badly. The money is ok-ish, it was a compromise on my side. But I don't want to be unemployed.

You say you took the job quickly as you needed the money.

Now, fortunately, you are in a more stable position and at least are getting ok-ish income.

You say you are not satisfied with that job, thus it seems to me that what you should do is to look for a new job, but now you can take more time to search for one that is a good fit for you.

Thus, based on what you describe, I suggest the following:

  1. Continue with your current job. Start job-searching, interviewing, etc..

  2. When you find a job you like, and you get an offer that you like, take it.

  3. Proceed to hand your notice period to your current employer. Serve it and move on to your new job.

  • 1
    +1. Worth noting that, from employer point of view, they needed something to do X, they were willing to pay Y, they had no vacancy on X+1 level or they found OP unsuitable for that +1 position... Of course they will not move OP from X to X+1 any time soon, there's no money in it for them. – Mołot Aug 22 at 13:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.