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I just graduated from my CS masters degree and am trying to find job. I have no prior work experience and I am in a pretty confused state about what I should be doing.

  1. I was told to do leetcode by a lot fellows and was suggested that it is the only technical stuff I should be preparing. I have been doing leetcode for a pretty long time and finished 500 ones, proficient in around 300 questions. However because my resume does not goes through HR most of the times and the question base grows day by day, it depletes my stamina to continue solving algorithm questions.

  2. I have been applying jobs online through glassdoor/indeed and the response rate is low, and I do not know how HR filters the resume. Is it necessary to network with the people in the group relevant with the job position before I apply?

  3. I have a friend who plans to open a restaurant and she wants me to write a online ordering system for her. I feel it could be a good plus on my resume and I accepted that. However I feel it could take me a lot time and energy to build a full-stack commercial app and doubt if it is worth it.

  4. Is there any other technical stuff I should be learning? or I should just be sticking on algorithm questions?

closed as off-topic by gnat, DJClayworth, Solar Mike, IDrinkandIKnowThings, BigMadAndy Aug 23 at 18:08

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  • "Questions asking for advice on a specific choice, such as what job to take or what skills to learn, are difficult to answer objectively and are rarely useful for anyone else. Instead of asking which decision to make, try asking how to make the decision, or for more specific details about one element of the decision. (More information)" – gnat, DJClayworth, Solar Mike, IDrinkandIKnowThings, BigMadAndy
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  • I would suggest applying directly through a company's website for positions instead of using third party sites. Also look up the company you'd like to work at in LinkedIn, see if you can connect with recruiters through there. Good Luck! – Katie Aug 22 at 22:22
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    Just finished my master degree – Jin Aug 22 at 22:26
  • That means you are no longer a student ;) editing your question for clarity – DarkCygnus Aug 22 at 22:34
  • Where (what country) do you live? Please edit your question to add a tag. – O. Jones Aug 23 at 11:41
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I was told to do leetcode by a lot fellows and was suggested that it is the only technical stuff I should be preparing. [...]

Is there any other technical stuff I should be learning? or I should just be sticking on algorithm questions?

You say you are a CS Masters graduate. I think that you should by now already know a good deal of technical stuff.

Of course, continue pursuing your interests, but with a Master in CS you already should have good skills that should enable you to perform well on a CS job.

Furthermore, you should try to learn or strengthen topics that are valuable in the industry and kinds of job you want. It's very different what is required for a, say, Deep Learning developer than a Frontend Developer. Decide what you want to work on and focus on strengthening skills relevant to that.

I have been applying jobs online through glassdoor/indeed and the response rate is low, and I do not know how HR filters the resume. Is it necessary to network with the people in the group relevant with the job position before I apply?

I've heard that those sites do not have the fastest response rates out there. Even if they did, it's expected that sometimes response rates are slow.

Networking always helps. It's not the only thing that matter, but it does help.

I have a friend who plans to open a resturant and she wants me to write a online ordering system for her. I feel it could be a good plus on my resume and I accepted that. However I feel it could take me a lot time and energy to build a full-stack commercial app and doubt if it is worth it.

If it's going to (1) give you some income, (2) let you hone your dev skills further, and (3) give you some experience you can put on your resume (which you currently lack), then I say it's worth it.

I suggest you at least consider meeting with this friend, so you can get into more detail on the idea. That way you will get a better idea of the extent and feasibility of doing it, and be able to decide if you take it or not.

  • Good answer. Look at the job boards (Glassdoor / indeed / etc) to find the companies that are hiring, then contact the companies directly. If you have craigslist in your area, look there too. I've hired some great people that way. And look for chances to socialize with people who do what you do (meetups, user groups, etc). – O. Jones Aug 23 at 11:43
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I have a friend who plans to open a restaurant and she wants me to write a online ordering system for her. I feel it could be a good plus on my resume and I accepted that. However I feel it could take me a lot time and energy to build a full-stack commercial app and doubt if it is worth it.

My first gig was a video rental system I did for a small shop - my father knew the owner and set this up for me. I did it while I was still studying. I was paid peanuts (and it was pretty low quality anyway) but it gave me something to put on my resume at the time.

It definitely helped me land my first real job. And after a couple of years I just stopped putting it into my resume as it was no longer relevant.

After I took a long break from software and came back the advice I was given was trying some freelancing work. Problem with that is the market is over-saturated (especially for web design).

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I have a friend who plans to open a restaurant and she wants me to write a online ordering system for her. I feel it could be a good plus on my resume and I accepted that. However I feel it could take me a lot time and energy to build a full-stack commercial app and doubt if it is worth it.

If you go ahead with this then make sure you get paid for it (and paid hourly, not as a lump sum - the scope will continue to grow).

There are two main reasons I say that:

  • You already know that solving algorithm questions depletes your stamina. Working for free will be no different - in fact it's likely to deplete it even more.
  • If you get paid for it then you can honestly list it as your first job. It's a lot easier to get interviews when you have a job on your CV than when you don't.

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