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I'm a computer science student in college. Over the summer, I lost a major scholarship and was removed from an honors program for my major.

One of my classes is a senior project course. I will be assigned to work in a team with a professor or local company to produce a software project for them over the course of the year. As part of the class, I need to write resumes and cover letters and submit them to the projects I would like to work on the most.

How should I handle the fact that I lost this scholarship over the summer? In particular, two of the projects I'm most interested in are with professors that taught me as part of the program that I was removed from. I sincerely think I would be a good fit for their projects. How should I prepare my resume and cover letter for them?

I would like to note that while I lost the scholarship, I have several other things going well for me: I've had two successful programming internships, one of which I'm still working at during the school year, I'm in good standing with the university at large, and my GPA is over 3.5. So I have a combination of very good things and very bad things that I need to discuss in my application materials.

closed as off-topic by Jim G., Michael Grubey, CincinnatiProgrammer, jmac, Rhys Sep 9 '13 at 13:50

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking advice on what job to take, what skills to learn, etc. are off-topic as the answers are rarely useful to anyone else." – Jim G., Michael Grubey, CincinnatiProgrammer, jmac
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    Couldn't you just omit them entirely? If they don't know about it then don't mention it and if they do tell them the truth (mostly) as most employers respect honesty. – Howdy_McGee Sep 6 '13 at 20:54
  • If you lost a scholarship that would not be something that they need to know. If you were removed from the honors program, be prepared to have to discuss that information during the interview. – mhoran_psprep Sep 7 '13 at 15:56
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Omitting them is likely the best route to take as Howdy notes. I switched from a Co-op program to a regular program in university which I didn't really like but I didn't get the work terms that was a requirement of the program. Write up your resume based on your current situation and recognize that the cover letter is likely more important where the question is how well can you demonstrate that you'd be a good pick to get the project done.

I also had some initial scholarships go away when my grades slipped enough that I didn't qualify to keep that scholarship though I did keep enough marks up that I was a TA for most of my university years.

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