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A friend of mine works as a Nurse Practitioner and is employed under an MD in his private clinic. The MD used to be very professional and approachable at the beginning when he started practicing his own, but once he started establishing his business, he turned out all greedy for money, pushing more hours onto the employees, renewing new contracts enforcing more work hours and unreasonable requirements for getting bonuses and so on.

Long story short, employees are unhappy with him and leaving the clinic and he literally tell them I don't care on their face. One of their office staff was resigning and during a group text conversation regarding a send off luncheon, he jokingly texted to the group, "BYE FELICIA". His wife who runs the office is no different and treats the employees kind of same way.

Now that my friend gave her notice, they are obviously unhappy with her leaving as she was a very efficient employee and had good reputations about her work among other MDs in the town. They all wants her to join their team. The MD's wife started making rude comments to her indirectly, stating they are getting so many NP's for interview and it's very over whelming seeing so many job applicants as if they don't really care about her leaving and could be easily replaced.

They do the same to every other employee when they leave the clinic. Pretty much trash talk about them. They are showing their true class now they have enough money and started to grow, they don't value their employees who helped them get there.

My friend was upset listening to these degrading talk but just ignored it. There is a 60 day notice requirement on leaving as per contract. So she will have to deal with this behavior for 2 more months.

What would be a professional way to handle this situation? Is speaking up recommended or is it better to just ignore and move on. I can't help to find this kind of behavior unacceptable.

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    What would the goal of saying something be here? It's a bad work environment, and she's leaving so that she won't have to deal with it any more. – Upper_Case Aug 28 at 20:58
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    There is 60 days notice requirement on leaving as per contract. So she will have to deal with this behavior for 2 more months. – yonikawa Aug 28 at 21:00
  • Are you sure this is about your "friend"? All your other questions have been about you wanting to leave... – Solar Mike Aug 28 at 21:03
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    @SolarMike - lol. Yes. It's my friend. I am still here stuck at this place interviewing candidates but none want to join our small company. I will bail out sooner or later but not yet. :) – yonikawa Aug 28 at 21:05
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    @SolarMike perhaps OP won't/can't tell, but anyways being this a friend or OP the answer would have the same goal – DarkCygnus Aug 28 at 21:05
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My friend was upset listening to these downgrading talk but just ignored it. Should she have said something about it or just suck it up and do her time and leave? Its not acceptable to have these kind of behavior regardless its your boss and his wife.

The professional response would have been to not say something and just move on to another place where these toxic situations don't happen (as your friend did).

Good thing your friend is out of that situation. Of course it's a unacceptable behavior what they did, and one may think that venting out could be an option, but one rarely gains anything from doing that.

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Some minor things: If you have to give two months notice, it’s absolutely fine to offer leaving immediately or after two weeks - if the offer is accepted, it’s fine. And if you do that and they insist on two months, it’s because they need you. So if you don’t accept rude behaviour anymore but complain loudly, what can they do? Fire you? Not a good idea if they need you, and you’re only there because your contract requires it.

  • Yeah... If they insist on having her there for two full months so they can abuse her, she may as well give it back, so long as she doesn't impair patient care or jeopardize herself. – Adonalsium Aug 29 at 19:24
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  1. If your friend were staying at this job, then she'd have to find a way to deal with this. But she isn't. So she doesn't. The world is full of rude and obnoxious people, and worse. Sometimes you have to deal with them and sometimes you don't. In this case, your friend is leaving in two months. She should bide her time as patiently as she can. People have endured far worse for far longer. These people are nothing but a momentary blip in her life. When she leaves she'll probably never see them again.

  2. What do you think she could say or do that would change their behavior? I'll tell you the answer: Nothing. There's nothing your friend could say or do that would change their behavior, so don't try. Leave it alone and take comfort in knowing that she'll be leaving in the blink of an eye. Two months in the span of your entire life is a blink.

  • Yes agreed. There's no magical word or phrase you can say to appease these types of people. It's like the chinese finger trick: the more force you use, the harder it gets, but the less you do, the better. – Dan Aug 29 at 13:18
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The MD's wife started making rude comments to her indirectly, stating they are getting so many NP's for interview and it's very over whelming seeing so many job applicants as if they don't really care about her leaving and could be easily replaced.

Answer: That is really good, just tell me if and when you need me to do the handover, I wish to make that process as smooth as possible.

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This will depend upon the local laws, but your friend may want to talk to an employment lawyer. There may be grounds for a harassment suit. It seems like it would be easy to prove, if their actions are considered harassment, given the publicity of their actions. Regarding that, I do not thing the "Bye Felicia" text would qualify as harassment. Immature, yes, but not harassment. However, even a letter from a lawyer, might go a long way in stifling their behavior.

Failing that, this friend can turn it around on the employer. She can always ask "since I am such a terrible person, can I be let out of my contract early"? Doing this three or four times will probably reduce their caustic behavior.

In the end, none of this matters. Your friend will likely go on to have a fun and rewarding career.

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