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There is this recruiter who I was impressed of the way he operates. The job he represented, benefits, salary and how he actually made it true that I got hired was really impressing. He is professional and has connections.

In addition, he demonstrated professionalism and "care" by actually following up, and every now and then, "investigating" if I am happy or would like to move on to something else. It is been a while I did not hear from him though while still employed.

Unfortunately, time is up to move on and out of my current job, which this recruiter found for me (or found me for the job - whichever comes first). I think my manager has some sense of my frustration and expecting me to jump ships. Today, I was contacted by that same recruiter, asking me how things are going and if I am still employed.

I would want to use him in my new search, but this will guarantee that my current manager know about my plan (Maybe good thing: I get a raise?), judging by the fact that they did and do business together. On the other had, I don't want to dismiss the recruiter, or "lie" by saying that every thing is OK but then switch jobs and burn bridges. I don't want to bad mouth my employer as well.

How to go around this?

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    How is your boss and the recruiter connected are they partners? – Neuromancer Sep 10 at 23:11
  • @Neuromancer No, not partners, but they do business together, which is how I got hired. Basically, my employer is the recruiter's client. – Lamba Dawet Sep 10 at 23:56
  • Why the downvote? – Lamba Dawet Sep 10 at 23:58
  • 1
    Downvotes happen sometimes. – Ben Barden Sep 11 at 21:32
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I would want to use him in my new search, but this will guarantee that my current manager know about my plan

This is not going to happen, because:

Before the switch: It is not in the recruiter's interest to inform your manager, as a recruiter earns commission when you get the job via them. But them telling your manager is a relationship spoiler for the recruiter and you, which affects their earning (this job hunt and any future job hunt you do), so they won't do it.

After the switch: It is not in the recruiter's interest to inform your manager, as a recruiter earns commission when they get a person hired for the manager/company. But them telling your manager is a relationship spoiler for the recruiter and the manager - as the manager can stop trusting them for future hires due to poaching, so the recruiter won't do it.

So either way, a good recruiter will not tell your manager.

But If you are really concerned about this, just bring it up verbally during discussion with the recruiter to not mention your plans of job change with anyone within your current company, and s/he will easily comply.

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Your wanting a new job is indisputably a good thing from the recruiters standpoint, It means he or she will get paid again.

Unless you're dealing with an in house recruiter or a real sleazeball, there's zero reason for one to burn bridges by tipping off your current employer.

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The recruiter will act in their best interest. And it’s absolutely not in their best interest to tell your boss.

I can go to a recruiter and say “I don’t want to stay in my job forever. I’m not in a rush, but give me a call if anything turns up.” Good news for the recruiter: He will eventually find a new job for me and cash in.

Telling my manager isn’t going to help. If my manager asks me why I’m leaving, guess who’s offers I’m not even looking at. Or I might get fired. Then I need a job and call every recruiter I know. Either way his chances of getting money through me have now dropped considerably.

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He demonstrated professionalism and "care" by actually following up, and every now and then, "investigating" if I am happy or would like to move on to something else. It is been a while I did not hear from him though while still employed.

His sole motivation is to place candidates in positions so that he can get paid. That means that a recruiter will "visit the well" many, many times. Their best source of candidates are those very people that they've previously placed into positions. He's reaching out to you in the sole interest of trying to place you in a position that he currently has empty so that he can earn his commission. If you tell him that you're happy and satisfied then he'll simply move on to the next person in his contact list. He is most certainly not looking out for your best interests.

This is not to say that any of this is negative. This is the recruiters job.

It's not in his best interests to inform your manager that you're looking for a job. That would put his relationship with you at risk... and he wants to maintain a relationship with you in the long term in the hopes that he can place you into future available positions... so that he can get paid.

If you like this recruiter and if you like the way they conducted themselves previously, then by all means use them again.

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