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I have a second job doing a couple shifts in a pub. They asked me to work this Sunday to which I agreed. I was supposed to start at 2pm.

I got a call from my dad (who is currently on vacation) at 12pm saying the kennels they had put their dogs in had called. The kennels had informed my dad before he went away that they were currently facing some licensing issues because they don't keep their dogs in cages, they let them sleep on sofas and beds. The kennel thought they might be able to get the issue resolved and so took my dad's dogs on anyway. However they called my dad and told him the license was not renewed so until they can sort out fitting cages into the premises, they have to have everyone come and collect their dogs.

My dad was on holiday in Barcelona so obviously couldn't come and get them, they tried to call his girlfriend's relatives but they were all out (those who could drive). My brother can't drive, so it fell to me to get the dogs.

I also had to stay with them once I had collected them as one of the dogs is quite elderly and cannot be left alone in case he falls down the stairs trying to get up them or needs to go to the toilet.

They called and asked me, and as this is my second job and they don't seem to mind when I turn shifts down, I figured so long as I told them what happened they will be okay. So I texted my manager explaining the problem and headed to my car.

I got to the kennels (about 45 minute drive away) - and noted no response from my boss. I tried calling and left a voicemail saying "Hey, it's 2pm now and I'm not sure if you have seen my message as you didn't reply. I don't want you to think I just haven't shown up so tried calling you to speak with you and make sure everything is okay". No response to the voicemail. I think okay, maybe work is busy. She might come back to me tomorrow morning before they open. Still nothing.

Just sent another message an hour ago and still nothing. I'm a little concerned my boss has seen her arse about the situation and is just choosing to ignore me. It's not really a huge concern as it's not my full time job so it's not critical to me, but I'd rather still have the job to save up towards Christmas, or if she has really taken offence and decided to sack me I'd rather she was adult and professional about it and told me rather than just ignoring my messages. Am I in the wrong here?

closed as unclear what you're asking by sf02, Victor S, rath, Gregory Currie, gnat Sep 16 at 14:22

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Some formatting would go a long way here. Also, while context tends to help, the exact specifics of why you missed the shift are not the main point here. Some elaboration on what you had previously agreed with your boss in terms of availability and notice of absence would be helpful. – Flater Sep 16 at 13:36
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    This is not going to be a constructive comment exactly but... what in the world are you talking about?? Maybe your boss is distancing herself to give you some time to gather your thoughts or avoiding the rather enthusiastic conversation I am imagining from trying to edit your post? – Victor S Sep 16 at 13:42
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    Your writing is all frantic is what I mean. I think you should calm down and see what comes up when your next shift is due rather than thinking about explaining why kennel related issues were an emergency. Worst case, you find another job like this within the month – Victor S Sep 16 at 13:48
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    Here is what I don't understand: 1. "they don't seem to mind when I turn shifts down" How do you equate that with they won't mind if I call off about an hour and a half before a shift I agreed to? 2. You say that you would rather she sack you if that is what she is going to do. Yet multiple times, you say this is just casual, it's a second gig, no big deal, doesn't matter if I skip, etc. So why does she have to formally sack you? If she has seen her arse about the whole thing (love you British cousins!) she does not need to sack you, she can just not sign you up for extra shifts anymore. – Damila Sep 16 at 14:58
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    Maybe the manager didn't get back to you because they were covering for you. By the way, turning shifts down is NOT THE SAME as cancelling with two hours notice. – Gregory Currie Sep 16 at 15:00
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You do not seem to understand the difference between declining a shift when the manager is doing the scheduling, and dropping an accepted shift with two hours notice on a Sunday. Think of it from her point of view. On Friday, if you had declined the shift, the manager could have easily scheduled someone else. On Sunday, with two hours notice, it would be much, much harder to get someone else to cover. You do not indicate whether the manager was planning to work that day, but if not your emergency may have interrupted her day off. If she was working, she may be tired because of a rough, short-handed shift.

On an informal, no contract, zero hours job there is no question of firing. It is more a matter of whether she chooses to offer you shifts in the future. At this point, her only obligation to you is to pay you for any work you have already done, and do any required paperwork related to that.

One possible reason for non-communication is that she has not yet decided whether to go on offering you shifts or not. Or it may just not be that important to her, and she has not got around to replying. Give it time, without bugging her any more. If you don't hear from her past at least one cycle when she would normally offer you a shift you could ask whether she is planning to allocate you shifts in the future. If not look for another part time job.

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