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I am planning to leave my job in January.

We receive raises/bonuses in December, and no matter what it is I will likely still be planning on leaving my current company. With that being said, I believe getting the biggest raise/promotion possible would be beneficial because on the very off chance I can't find work then I still benefit from the raise, and it will also give a better estimate of what I should be looking to match/exceed with whatever new company.

Would this potentially leave a sour taste in the mouth of the previous employer?

At the end of the day, it's not the biggest deal in the world if the previous employer isn't super thrilled but at the same time, I try not to burn any bridges (The world is too small for that). Or maybe leave off the promotion part?

I've worked three years at my current company and if I was staying I think I could make a pretty strong case from going from a junior title to just a regular title. Obviously, I'd prefer to have the new title when interviewing as well, but the raise AND promotion a little too much?

Possible solution: get the largest raise possible, then if I do get a new job, no matter what the salary is, say "Hey I'm very sorry, and the offer is absolutely amazing but I did receive another offer that is even better and have decided to take it!"

  • Is there anything your current company can do to keep you? Or are you planning to leave regardless of how things go in December? If you're going to leave no matter what, asking for a promotion right before you go could certainly leave a sour taste in their mouth. And like you said, "the world is too small for that". – DWShore Sep 19 at 14:13
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Ask For Raise / Promotion Before Leaving?

You can and should ask for a raise if you feel that the value that you currently are providing to the company is worth more than what you are currently paid.

The promotion, if you intend to leave, you should not ask for. When you ask for a promotion, you are asking for more responsibilities within the company and by accepting the role you are indirectly showing that you are committed to the company. Since you plan on leaving, it would leave a sour taste to ask for a promotion and then leave. Also, the experience you may gain for a month or two after accepting your promotion is not enough to be worthy of adding to your resume.

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Would this potentially leave a sour taste in the mouth of previous employer?

Most probably yes, plus if (for example) you go up a rank and your next employer asks how long you held that position they might not look favourably on you leaving after a very short period of time. Maybe you couldn't cut it? Maybe you were asked to go. IMHO that would be a flag in recruiting outside of redundancy.

At the end of the day it's not the biggest deal in the world if previous employer isn't super thrilled but at the same time I try not to burn any bridges (The world is too small for that).

I think you underestimate how small the world is, even with your own comment, companies talk and managers move from company to company.

if I was staying I think I could make a pretty strong case from going from a junior title to just a regular title

If you're a junior then you need to be getting all the experience you can, IMHO I'd recommend working on this and then building skills rather. However, as you plan to leave, I'd leave on the best possible term you can at your current employer.

How you act can follow you long after you've left. However, is it wrong to ask for a raise? Absolutely not, you can take a chance if you feel you can justify it to your employer and that will help looking for future work.

  • Yea, that's why I was leaning towards just the raise. It's too bad because if I was planning on staying I think I could make a strong case for a promotion, but at the end of the day title isn't too important – workThrowAway Sep 19 at 1:22
  • Title generally isn't, but it can be in certain circumstances. If you're a junior and apply for a senior role you might not get as favourable responses from recruitment. – MattR Sep 19 at 1:23
  • Nah it would just be Junior Engineer to Engineer. Thanks for the insight, i'll just go with the raise – workThrowAway Sep 19 at 1:33

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