8

The branch I was assigned to was understaffed so I do both workloads, for the supervisor position and mine as assistant in operations. I also do accounting entries, reports, checks, investment,fillings, bills, supplies, and lot more but was not allowed over time.

On top of that a supervisor from another department mistreats and nags at me as well as asks me to do chores for her. Being too occupied in those areas I wasn't able to do an adjustment entry for one particular category and when I finally had a supervisor it turned out that she's a newbie and asked me for a lot of demonstrations to perform duties. This consumed a lot of my time since I was doing most of her work.

When I couldn't take it anymore I resigned - I rendered 30 days and finally got off the job. But 1 month after they were audited they found out about the unadjusted category which I mentioned before. Do I still have the responsibility to deal with it?

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    Did you report that the adjustment needed doing at the time it should have been done? – Patricia Shanahan Oct 9 at 0:30
15

Why would you have responsibility for it?

Let's simplify the picture to help make things clearer. You work for, say, a company that sells hats - and you're their only hat sales staff. A call comes in: ABC Enterprises didn't get their hats they ordered last month. You wouldn't expect to get Alice - the former hat saleswoman - to handle this. Because she no longer works for the company, and the company hired you to take over her responsibilities. It's now your job to handle whatever responsibilities Alice had - it's now your responsibility to fix this problem. That's why they hired you.

Likewise, you leave the hat game (it's a cruel business that chews up and spits out even the very best) - so the company hires/appoints someone to take over your hat-selling responsibilities. So if another problem crops up, guess what? The new hat salesperson has to deal with it.

Once you leave a job, you have zero responsibilities to that company (assuming you weren't doing something illegal.) Whoever took over your responsibilities is the person that needs to handle whatever problems have cropped up in their process - even if those problems were due to a mistake you made during your time there. (And that's perfectly fine. I'm a computer programmer, and I can tell you: NONE of us ever leave a job where we didn't screw up at least one thing - bugs happen, and a lot of dev time is maintenance.)

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    "I'm a computer programmer, and I can tell you: NONE of us ever leave a job where we didn't screw up at least one thing" ... I shiver at the thought of having to be responsible for all possible code bugs introduced over the last 15 years on any of the jobs I've had!! What a terrifying thought – Jorge Córdoba Oct 9 at 14:48
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    "maintenance" is just the polite form of "yelling at the things your predecessor left behind" – Borgh Oct 10 at 14:09

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