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I started a new job, worked over 48 hrs, and then they rescinded their offer for employment. I signed their offer before starting work.

Are they still required to pay me for the hours that I worked even though they rescinded instead of "firing" me?

If so, how can I go about getting the money they owe me?

Who do I need to contact about this?

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3 Answers 3

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Are they still required to pay me for the hours that I worked even though they rescinded instead of "firing" me?

Assuming you are in the US, they are absolutely required to pay you for all hours worked.

Once you have started working, there is no difference between "rescinded" and "fired", as far as whether or not you should be paid.

If so, how can I go about getting the money they owe me?

First, ask them when you can expect your pay.

If that fails, talk to your state's office of the Attorney General and/or the Department of Labor.

Who do I need to contact about this?

Whoever will help you from these government agencies.

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  • "Once you have started working, there is no difference between "rescinded" and "fired"." Well, no difference with respect to the question of whether pay is owed. Oct 13, 2019 at 21:37
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Yes, of course you are. They are obliged to pay you for all the hours you worked.

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  • And statutory notice Oct 12, 2019 at 15:17
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Yes absolutely they do. If they offered you a job and you accepted then a contract is made, and once a contract is made it cannot be arbitrarily cancelled by either side. If you actually started to work then that confirms it.

So they unquestionably owe you for they days you have worked. They may also owe you pay in lieu of notice, since in general someone cannot be fired without notice even after two days.

That said it may be tricky to get what you are owed without spending more on legal fees than you would get. Many places have a way you can get unpaid wages without needing a lawyer, and you should definitely try that. You might also like to do everyone else this company might try to cheat and go after them full throttle.

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    In general. The US is an outlier. Oct 12, 2019 at 0:05
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    A lot of countries have probation period for a contract, in that period the contract can be cancelled at any time for any (or no) reason. Of course, you will still need to get paid for the time you worked. Oct 12, 2019 at 16:58
  • @MarkRotteveel "at any time for any (or no) reason" does not always mean "with no notice." Oct 12, 2019 at 16:59
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    @DJClayworth True, but in my country it does. In the probation period (legally max one or two months depending on duration of the contract), it can be cancelled within the probation period, effective immediately. Oct 12, 2019 at 17:01
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    @Mark Rotteveel - I've had a one week notice period in at least one of my probation periods Oct 14, 2019 at 23:40

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