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Context

About once or twice a month, I receive a message on LinkedIn from recruiters who state that they liked my resume and wanted to talk for a potential job offer or applying in their hiring process.


Points to Consider

  • My LinkedIn has "looking for opportunities" off;
  • I know many recruiters "mass-send" these messages;
  • I don't think this is a big number of offers, but most of my colleagues don't receive any;
  • I currently really enjoy my work;
  • I talked to some of them, but never agreed to proceed with the process, thus never got an offer;
  • Company neglected poaching and offered no retention bonus until a group of people left in succession;

Question

I was wondering if these could have any value at my current company, would it? I'm assuming it is a weak fact to vouch for a raise or promotion, but can sharing an information like "I'm actively being contacted by recruiters" do any good, rather than harm? If so, how?

Thanks!


References

I did look into a bunch of other posts, but none seemed to tackle exactly this issue:

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    IMO unless you have an offer in hand and you bargain with HR on that and considering your position is critical in the organization (one which is very difficult to replace) I can't think of any way to get benefitted out of such recruiters messages. Or may be a good weapon to get promotion by showcasing that "Hey my skill are demanding and If not valued here I have options outside". Good Luck – foo-baar Oct 17 at 2:39
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Is there value in recruitment messages?

Short answer: actually, no.

Long answer: (see below).


I'm assuming it is a weak fact to vouch for a raise or promotion

Your assumption is very good. Even worse, the company might become "sad" that you are not loyal enough, and not treat you adequately as a result.


can sharing an information like "I'm actively being contacted by recruiters" do any good, rather than harm?

Nope, see above. More harm than good.


The ONLY way this could work in your favor is the following:

  • you actually (secretly) apply for those jobs, and go almost to the end;
  • just before signing the contract with the new company, request a short delay, to think about it, and to discuss the situation with your current company, to be able to guarantee the start date;
  • with the written offer, go to your current company and ask if they can match and exceed that offer;
  • if YES, then you will probably want to stay, or go back to the new company and show the extra you received - actually making the two companies bid for you;
  • if NO, you move to the new company;

Of course, you cannot really do this several times per year, each year.

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    All good, except on accepting a counteroffer to stay. This (almost) never works out. You just end up leaving in the year, voluntary or not. – Jeffrey supports Monica Oct 17 at 11:58
  • I have from 3 to 6 contacts per week and still would consider it a very weak point. – Czar Oct 17 at 12:15
  • @Jeffrey: you might be right, but I did not have that kind of experience, even partially. – virolino Oct 17 at 12:32

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