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I am considering a managerial position in a different organization at my university.

After going through my internal connections, I was led to the email address of who would be my future coworker. We both would manage a team of developers.

Is it ethical/appropriate to send them an email to connect with the intent of potentially applying for the position? If I could get more information from someone who is in the position I am applying for, it will give me a better idea as to what to expect beyond the information shared in the job posting.

My current situation is that I'm not being utilized much at my current organization as a developer, and there are no signs it will change, though I have informed my boss and boss's boss of my discontent six weeks ago.

I want to connect and share my current situation with this potential future coworker and share that the job posting closely aligns with what I have done in the past. In other words, how much information can I share?

4

After going through my internal connections, I was led to the email address of who would be my future coworker. We both would manage a team of developers.

Is it ethical/appropriate to send them an email to connect with the intent of potentially applying for the position? If I could get more information from someone who is in the position I am applying for, it will give me a better idea as to what to expect beyond the information shared in the job posting.

It's reasonable to do this. But be careful and make sure your potential co-worker understands that you want to keep this confidential, so that it doesn't get back to your current boss, or anyone on your current team.

The best way by far to do this is a face to face conversation. You'll be able to ask questions and see and hear the responses. You'll get to see what the working environment is like. And you'll demonstrate that you are willing to put in some effort toward this position.

The next best way is by telephone. The least effective way is by email.

No matter how you do this, don't badmouth your boss or current team.

  • Would using email (or telephone) to set up a face to face conversation appropriate? – user111037 Oct 18 at 19:34
  • I have no intentions of badmouthing my current team. I have appreciated the opportunity to develop professionally, but the lack of direction is killing my morale. – user111037 Oct 18 at 19:34
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It’s a definite maybe.

Try to get the support of your bosses instead of this “connection” in getting this new position. Let them know that it’s something that you’re interested in. Best case is that they will, worst case is they will be royally pissed... which is the same spot they will be in anyway if they don’t hear from you first.

Since the new position is still in the same university, it’s very likely, if not a certainty that one of your bosses will hear about it.

How will your current bosses react when they get wind of this from someone else instead of you? Better yet, fast forward yourself when you get the management spot... how would you react if you heard that one of your guys went out and applied to a job in another department that’s being run by one of your peers?

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