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There were some lay offs recently, and I have noticed that I am being targeted by the team as a prompt to be the next to get laid off. For example:

  • Performance hits by decreasing estimates of my work. For example, if the work will be done by me and requires x points of effort, they estimate it as x/2.

  • Obvious ignore of my written requests/announcements. I understand it as: We can't help you, we don't want to help you, we don't care, nothing great (but it is - like sharing a script that saves time for all of us).

  • Ambiguity about my presence. For example, I am calling in remotely (which is very normal in the department), the boss walks by, the meeting "driver" will not mention that I am there (will mention all remotes atm but me)

  • No recognition of my hard work at all. Especially when the boss is around, in representations, no "thank you", no "good job", just silence. No silence for others (them).

  • Double standards. Each one is nice, supportive and smiling when one-to-one. But in meetings and/or around boss, they are just different.

Note: I am the newest but I exceed expectations in my performance. There was a recognition of that by boss (and still) and by the team which is why I still have my position - and other (older, more senior) were laid off. But only recently, the team is backing off, and as the title mentions they are "targeting" me (to save their positions?).

Should I openly tell my manager what I feel? Am I interpreting the above signals wrong?

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Should I openly tell my manager what I feel? Am I interpreting the above signals wrong?

We cannot say, for sure. However, it's too soon to escalate your "observation" to your manager. There are couple of things you should do before you switch to "complaining" mode.

Performance hits by decreasing estimates of my work. For example, if the work will be done by me and requires x points of effort, they estimate it as x/2.

Refuse to accept the assignment with that estimate, escalate as needed.

Obvious ignore of my written requests/announcements. I understand it as: We can't help you, we don't want to help you, we don't care, nothing great (but it is - like sharing a script that saves time for all of us).

After a gentle reminder that did not work, loop in your superior / reporting manager to keep them aware of the non-cooperative behavior.

Ambiguity about my presence. For example, I am calling in remotely (which is very normal in the department), the boss walks by, the meeting "driver" will not mention that I am there (will mention all remotes atm but me)

Just speak up, something like "hey, I'm X, also on the bridge".

No recognition of my hard work at all. Especially when the boss is around, in representations, no "thank you", no "good job", just silence. No silence for others (them).

That's something you cannot do anything about. Keep record of the work you do and the value you deliver. Verbal appreciations are good, but documented work records certainly trump them.

Double standards. Each one is nice, supportive and smiling when one-to-one. But in meetings and/or around boss, they are just different.

This does not fit in with your previous description (of being non-responsive and trying to avoid you) - anyways, you need to only maintain a working relationship with them - don't expect them to be your friend (if you find one, that's great, just don't keep any expectation) - expect a proper working relationship with proper collaboration and communication, nothing more, nothing less.

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    @LambaDawet Updated. – Sourav Ghosh Oct 23 '19 at 14:11
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Should I openly tell my manager what I feel? Am I interpreting the above signals wrong?

If you are going to speak to your manager bring up only facts, not what you feel may be happening. Only the first two examples are worthy of discussing with your manager. If the work estimates are incorrect, you demonstrate to your manager why this is the case. If your written requests are being ignored, you show the manager the original and followup requests so that he may take whatever action is necessary.

The third example is up to you to handle and does not need to be discussed with your manager. You need to speak up for yourself if the other team members either purposely or accidentally left you out of a roll call.

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From what you wrote, the time to act is now. Document what you can on the part of miscommunications and other examples, as tangible as you can.

Schedule a meeting with your estranged boss,

Present it to him as unoffensive as possible.

And based on that, ask for relocation to a different team.

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