1

I'm leaving my job and I'm wondering if I should address the letter to both the Direct Boss and the Overall Head.

I need to preface by saying that Direct Boss is pretty much an echo of Overall Head. DB is quite cold and formal in their approach but very few decisions are made without the approval of Overall Head. When I give DB my letter, I already know that DB would simply say, "I'll raise this to OH."

OH is younger than DB, and so has better relations with the people in the company. OH is especially nice to me, and always asks me how I am doing, since I have a special role in the company as a consultant with unique benefits. OH can become emotional when provoked (though I have never personally witnessed it) and is very casual, ie. giving instructions directly to junior associates without considering the proper hierarchy of delegation.

I am worried that by resigning only to DB, OH will feel hurt that I did not address a letter to OH, or that I did not raise my issues first. However, if I copy furnish both bosses, DB might feel as if I am stepping over their authority.

Should I stick with protocol and address only to DB? If it is better to furnish both bosses with the letter, how should I go about it formatting-wise as well as process-wise?

  • +1 This is an excellent example of the downside of an unclear hierarchy. – A. I. Breveleri Nov 5 at 17:47
  • @A.I.Breveleri Technically, hierarchies are clear; it's the practices that are messy. It's definitely a disorganized workplace. – onthewing Nov 5 at 17:54
  • You could give the letter formally to your boss and send a quick email to OH. – Stephan Branczyk Nov 5 at 18:31
6

I'm leaving my job and I'm wondering if I should address the letter to both the Direct Boss and the Overall Head.

You are overthinking this by a wide margin.

Just resign to your "Direct Boss" and let them handle it from there.

As word gets around, perhaps your Overall Head will want to talk to you about it.

3

I'm leaving my job and I'm wondering if I should address the letter to both the Direct Boss and the Overall Head.

If it were me I wouldn't... because that's my personal preference. I follow the "chain of command" unless there's an issue that dictates that I break the chain of command.

If you feel that OH would feel sighted by not sending it to them then do so.

0

Address it to DB, and include OH as a courtesy if you have any relationship with him.

It comes down to decision theory, Choice under uncertainty.

The simple matrix is below

enter image description here

The consequences of including OH is that at the very worst, he will be mildly unhappy. But, if you excluding him, and he's likely to be upset, he will be VERY upset.

Logically, you should include him, as the risk is minimal.

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