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A friend of mine works as a Nurse Practitioner and was employed under an MD in his private clinic. She recently quit her job and now the ex-employer wants to hire her back. She ended up leaving the employer due to being mistreated and working under poorly written contract that mainly supported the employer interests alone. Though a very credible employee with excellent reputation in the industry, employer took her for granted and wasn't compensated fairly enough.

Once the resignation letter was submitted, the employer's wife (charge of Administration) literally started trash talking my friend and stated she could be easily replaced in no time among other things. Once my friend left the position, the employer started losing clients and business, now that those clients know my friend left and never liked her employer's way of conducting business to begin with.

So, the ex employer is trying his best to hire her back to recover his lost business and reputation. He's willing to sign a new contract with better compensation and whatever it takes to get her back in the team.

Meanwhile, his competitors are trying hard to get her in their team as well. Pretty much they all want to cash in her reputation among the clients. That's the bottom line.

Should she accept the ex employer's offer regardless of the prior bad experience (financial and emotional stress, being insulted) just for money sake? Or learn from experiences and find a better employer?

Or in other words, think practically than emotionally?

Update:

As per new contract, she will work as 1099 contractor on her own terms and flexibility compared to W2 employee status earlier(more like a commission based role). In addition, she will be taking home a bigger chunk of the revenue generated (50% or more). Earlier, it was a flat base salary and being pushed to see more clients to meet the numbers.

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    If she could not handle the emotional stress before, what has changed that makes her think that she would be able to now? – sf02 Nov 7 at 20:42
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    @y2k I see, but no contract will address how she is treated and if it is the same ex employer how they treat their employees (contractor) likely has not changed. – sf02 Nov 7 at 20:54
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    To be honest, I am willing to bet that before long, the old habits will return. If he mistreated her before, he will most likely do the same again if she returns. – JustSaying Nov 7 at 20:58
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    @JustSaying - It was his wife and not him. He is cunning like a fox and knows exactly how to interact with people. My friend later informed her boss about his wive's behavior/statement and immediately he acted all surprised and told her he would have given her an official written warning that goes in her records if he was made aware of it when happened. As if, the husband will discipline his wife for bad conduct. :) – y2k Nov 7 at 21:02
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    She left for good reason... There are no good reasons to go back. She should go elsewhere and take the clients with her. As per both answers. – Solar Mike Nov 7 at 21:11
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A wolf remains a wolf, even if he has not eaten your sheep

The ex-employer has been abusive, was nasty, and even went so far to tell your friend that finding a replacement would be no problem.

You are dealing with a wolf, and you know that.

Up until this point, your friend was a victim. Going back to that situation would make your friend a volunteer.

I can see nothing good coming from this.

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    "Going back to that situation would make your friend a volunteer." -- this. – Mister Positive Nov 7 at 21:22
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    Also -- if ex-employer is willing to engage her as a contractor at 50% of gross revenue, surely at least one of his competitors is willing to make the same offer. Maybe even better. – A. I. Breveleri Nov 7 at 23:22
  • The contract sounds pretty good from the "wolf", but she can use it to get a similar deal with a new employer. +1 – Pete B. Nov 8 at 18:42
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Should she accept the ex employer's offer regardless of the prior bad experience (financial and emotional stress, being insulted) just for money sake? Or learn from experiences and find a better employer?

She recently left

  • she was mistreated
  • a poor contract
  • took her for granted
  • wasn't compensated enough
  • trash talked her
  • stated she could be easily replaced
  • his competitors are trying hard to get her in their team

None of that sounds like a place to which I'd want to return. I can't imagine your friend would actually want to go back.

Unless she is desperate, she should find a better job and put this one far behind her.

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    Even if she is desperate, OP states that the competitors are pursuing her so she doesn't even need the ex-employer. – sf02 Nov 7 at 20:56
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    Personally I think it would be advisable to avoid the ex-employer all together. – JustSaying Nov 7 at 21:01
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Jerks remain jerks. They just can hide it temporarily

There is no reason to think that the employer has fundamentally changed. She has options, why go back to the lousy one? Unless the money is truly superb and thus makes the rest worth it.

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