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I received a job offer with a company that has several corporate locations (in different states), one of which is in the metro area I live in. The recruiter stated they cannot offer me the preferred location because they would not be compliant with "laws" stating they cannot fill a job in a location different than what was listed in the job posting. Is this at all true?

For context, I was encouraged by a friend within that company to apply to the positions that align with my interest and experience regardless of location because they have a great need to add head count to those parts of the organization. Maybe this was poor advice but nevertheless, I am trying to see if I have no leverage or not since they are claiming some law. If their leadership prefers certain locations.

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    If they have decided that they don't want to hire you for a specific role in a specific location then why does the reason matter? You seem stuck on their reason of "because of laws" but what do you hope to gain by clarifying that? What is your ultimate goal? – dwizum Nov 22 '19 at 15:53
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Likely, an external recruiter isn't allowed to fill position in other locations because of the way the contract between the employer and the recruitment agency works. This isn't illegal, but not everyone understands that breaking a contract isn't necessarily a crime and is a civil matter.

If they're an internal recruiter, it may just be against their policy but the agent you're working with is still conflating policy with law.

Either way, I wouldn't expect them to understand or bend on their understanding of what they must follow.

Nothing prevents you from reaching out to the employer directly and asking if there's availability in the location you desire.

  • Breaking a contract is technically breaking the law, civil contract law, nothing criminal (might annoy a judge though). – Donald Nov 24 '19 at 0:09
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It's important to fill in the pronoun 'they' in your sentence:

...with "laws" stating they cannot fill a job in a location different than what was listed in the job posting. Is this at all true?

Once you fill in the pronoun:

with "laws" stating the recruiting company cannot fill a job in a location different than what was listed in the job posting. Is this at all true?

... the situation becomes a lot clearer. In this case, you're basically free to apply directly with the company (or through a different recruiter.) The recruiting company is hoping you don't do this, and either take the job at the location they can place you at, or with a different company entirely - but it's solely because they want the commission for your placement.

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