0

Where most questions on this topic are about how to tell a future employer that the applicant is no longer interested in the offer, I'd like to know: how can I accept an offer for an internship with the understanding that I may need to renege at a later date?

I've completed multiple interviews with this company (company 'B'). It looks promising and surely wouldn't be a bad place to be this summer. Central US, IT related. However, I've been working through the hiring process with another company ('A'), and it has taken quite some time. I will be scheduling a site tour next month that will be very exciting. I'd like to make a good impression at both companies. I have been given the offer to join company B, and I would like to accept. If I do not get another offer in time for summer, this will be a good backup. However, if I eventually get an offer for A, I would prefer to work there.

Furthermore, there are positions opening at a third company in a few months. These also sound very interesting, but I can always apply there in future years.

Is there any way I can let HR at B know about this while I accept the offer? It's a little bit of a tough spot: I have no prior internship experience and hiring me would surely be a risk. I also don't want my reputation, or that of my school, to be damaged. Is it better to take the gamble that I will find a better internship opportunity, and drop out of consideration immediately? I have a few days to decide. Any suggestions?

1
2

How to accept internship offer but keep the ability to renege?

and

I will be scheduling a site tour next month that will be very exciting.

They are not going to allow this. Were you talking a few days, then perhaps. But you are talking timelines of months and months. If you renege several months from now, they would need to restart the process from scratch to fill your spot, having missed most other candidates by that time.

Your choices are:

  1. Accept and go.

  2. Accept and just renege later (reputational damage comes with this).

  3. Decline and obtain an internship elsewhere.

We cannot really advise you on what to do as we don't know anything about these companies or your particular interests.

1
  • Besides, nobody wants to hear they're plan B. – Stephan Branczyk Dec 10 '19 at 2:53
1

What I would do:

  • Call Company A and ask them how long the hiring process will take and if they can speed it up, since you already have another offer.

  • Ask Company B how long they can wait for your final decision.

Ideally, you will have a time slot where you have offers from both on the table. If this does not work out, you have to decide. You can surely take the offer from company B and then cancel it later, if A comes around (make sure to not sign anything that says otherwise). Although this is bad style and will probably burn some bridges there, sometimes a career opportunity is more important. You´ll have to way the importance of this one for yourself.

Of course you can also reject company B now and hope that A will take you on later. Only do this if you can afford do have neither of those!

1
  • Yeah the problem is really company A. Even if they're amazing, they're really causing you a strategic problem by being so slow. You need to lean on A. – ObscureOwl Dec 11 '19 at 9:55
1

Is there any way I can let HR at B know about this while I accept the offer? It's a little bit of a tough spot: I have no prior internship experience and hiring me would surely be a risk. I also don't want my reputation, or that of my school, to be damaged. Is it better to take the gamble that I will find a better internship opportunity, and drop out of consideration immediately? I have a few days to decide. Any suggestions?

It's risky, but you could just be honest.

Something like "I'd like to work here, but I'm in the middle of interviewing at another company right now that frankly would be a better fit for this summer. I expect to hear from them [whatever time frame you expect]. Would it be okay if I give you my final answer then?"

If they say No, then you'll need to be prepared to make a quick decision. Decide ahead of time if this is worth the gamble or not.

It sounds as if you could have several other possible offers for next summer available to you. So this might lessen the need to accept the offer from company B. But that's a decision only you can make.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .