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I don't share people's ideas on the job I currently do, but I really enjoy my job.

Example: Someone says in a project meeting "this project has no objectives", and I'm the only one who thinks that is absolutely ridiculous! I discuss, but by doing that, I lose support in other matters. Really: since then, I feel they consider me at least unadapted.

(Update: section deleted since I incorrectly tagged a behavior as lacking of ethics, see the multiple comments).

I enjoy my work, but I don't like people's lack of critical mind. No one takes never a different position, usually they all ---except me--- have always the same opinion.

I can survive isolating myself, although it is not nice. And I perceive they think I isolate myself because I don't want to work, which is obviously false. I like doing what I do!

How should I react when I'm asked for activities like "knowing ourselves better"? Truly, I don't want to know better AT ALL people lacking critical spirit. Should I risk my current position (not the job, I don't fear losing the job, but risking the position where I have more chances to influence critical decisions) confronting everyone about critical spirit? Should I isolate more?

  • Can you elaborate on the opinion part? What opinions did they and you have for example, where you disagreed? – Battle Dec 10 '19 at 9:30
  • I think that some more details on your examples would help people get a clearer picture of your situation – user3399 Dec 10 '19 at 10:40
  • I'm not seeing how the issues you've described are matters of ethics. – joeqwerty Dec 10 '19 at 12:37
  • Ok, thanks, I've removed all references to unethical behavior. – MechanicalEngineer Dec 10 '19 at 13:40
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Nothing, apart from personal aggression (?) in this post stands out as lacking ethics.

Perhaps the situation is due to most of them can be said to be millenials, and I'm older.

This stands out as a primary issue, you've already separated yourself from your team by age without trying. You're making it a me vs them battle, instead of an us vs the problem.

I had a technical argument with someone (who wasn't right!)

There's rarely a black and white answer to a problem, especially a technical one. In their mind, and maybe others, they were right and you had a difference approach. Perhaps by age you're more experienced or exposed to the company you're working for compared to your younger colleagues, but maybe a softer approach to discussing alternatives would work.

I didn't accept that and made a strong remark about what he just did (never exceeded any limit, I stand on my position, I did it well).

Are you sure? Who sets the limits? In my company, a stern bollocking from anyone outside of management is cause for concern and a meeting. Unless you're a manager, which the post doesn't indicate, it seems your manager(s) were right in taking you off the project.

And I perceive they think I isolate myself because I don't want to work, which is obviously false. I like doing what I do!

Your approach, at least by the wording of this post, seems like you may be difficult to work with.

Should I risk my current position (not the job, I don't fear losing the job, but risking the position where I have more chances to influence critical decisions) confronting everyone about ethics and critical spirit?

I would consider pulling someone above me into a 1 on 1 meeting and discussing how you can better approach problems within the team. Personally I'd recommend the manager that took you off the project, as they first hand had an issue with the behaviour you showed.

It could well be that people are being too sensitive and they don't want anyone who says no. I've been in places like that before and it's unpleasant. But from the way this post is written and the attitude you've taken in certain phrasings, I would try to sit with a manager and work out how you can better fit into the team so you can work more effectively.

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    @RAP-ReinstateMonicaCellio I don't see anything in your example pointing towards a group ethical misconduct. From your examples it does not seems like any of your problems lies with ethics. – user3399 Dec 10 '19 at 10:43
  • @MechanicsEngineer maybe you are, but since you don't specify any example of "personnal aggression" we can't really say if it's actually one, or not. – user3399 Dec 10 '19 at 13:05
  • @user3399 Fixed. No more references to ethics and personal aggressions. – MechanicalEngineer Dec 10 '19 at 13:44
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Judging by some quotes from your question and comments on other answers...

"I can't educate people who refuse to listen"

"Perhaps the situation is due to most of them can be said to be millenials, and I'm older."

"Truly, I don't want to know better AT ALL people lacking ethics and critical spirit."

"But the project resulted into a disaster due to the influence of such person"

...I am going to go out on a limb and say you might be the problem.

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  • I assume your answer is that I should isolate from the rest, given that I stand on each one of these statements. I don't mind it, because I cannot accept unethical behavior in exchange of integration. Even if you don't like the fact that people that refuse to listen can't change its perspective, that a project can fail due to one person, etc. – MechanicalEngineer Dec 10 '19 at 12:04
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    "I assume your answer is that I should isolate from the rest". No. My answer is you should probably work on your interpersonal skills. – YoupT Dec 10 '19 at 12:05
  • Ok, I accept that I am probably the problem. Thanks. I will think where the problem might be. – MechanicalEngineer Dec 10 '19 at 12:43
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It's not about either fighting always or keeping yourself isolated - it's a choice you need to make, to pick your battles.

From your example:

Someone says in a project meeting "this project has no objectives", and I'm the only one who thinks that is absolutely ridiculous! I discuss, but by doing that, I lose support in other matters.

Maybe that person who made the comment does not have the visibility which you posses, and by trying to share the knowledge you can educate them and help them to see the prospect. Remember, you need to teach them how to expand their vision, not impose your decisions/ understanding on them.

In other hand:

I had a technical argument with someone (who wasn't right!), so he started a personal aggression... The consequence was I got removed from several functions in the project. .... But the project resulted into a disaster due to the influence of such person, in my opinion.

This time, you had a different opinion, and because they did not like you, they stopped involving you and ended up in failure. Assuming that the discussions were on-record, and you were not in charge of the project (as a supervisor or in managerial capacity), they would be answerable - not you. Get over with and move on.

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  • @RAP-ReinstateMonicaCellio from your comments and post, you've said several time that "they're not very critical-minded", but are you ? When you made your position known, did you consider the possibility that you were wrong ? Your post does not indicate that, to quote : "I had a technical argument with someone (who wasn't right!)". – user3399 Dec 10 '19 at 10:49
  • @user3399: You are right, in spite the problem revealed with time and people seeked my advice, I will accept I can always improve my critical thinking. – MechanicalEngineer Dec 10 '19 at 13:20

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