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I am starting a new job. It had been my understanding that each piece of paper work required would take at least 5 days to process. This gave me expectations as to what the start date would be. I submitted some paper work yesterday to get a message today saying I have training scheduled for tomorrow. Due to other commitments, including my previous job, I cannot start tomorrow. I can take a day off the following day, and officially begin the next week. How can I tactfully convey this to my new manager? I hate to get off to a rough start.

Is this best done through email or a phone call?

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    did your written or verbal job offer include a start date? – Kate Gregory Dec 10 '19 at 20:34
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Due to other commitments, including my previous job, I cannot start tomorrow. I can take a day off the following day, and officially begin the next week. How can I tactfully convey this to my new manager?

Say it exactly the way you wrote it here. And make sure you say what you want your actual start date to be.

But you really should always come to an agreement on your official start date when you formally accept an offer.

Is this best done through email or a phone call?

It's always best to say it in a phone call and follow up with an email repeating the conclusions.

On the phone, you can always answer questions, clarify things, and come to on the spot agreements together. You can't do that without a lot of emails back and forth. Always, phone first.

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It's definitely best to do this through a phone call, and be sure to couch your situation in terms of your responsibility to your previous employer. If part of the reason is that you have a personal commitment I'd encourage you to skip over that. Focus on the professional reasons that you have a conflict.

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Your best option is to telephone first and email confirmation of that communication immediately thereafter.

In the telephone call, explain that there was an indication that there would be a delay between filing the paperwork and the commencement, and that you have an obligation that you cannot neglect.

When I commenced with my current employer, I was offered an immediate start but I instead said that although my current employment was casual I would prefer to give at least two week's notice. This was met with understanding and some respect, both from both employers old and new.

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