4

I had an interview this morning which lasted several hours. First I met with several of the IT managers, one of whom I would presumably end up working for if I was hired. Then an hour with someone from HR. Then a half hour with the development and data architects, and another hour with several technical staffers.

What is the recommended protocol for thank-you notes in this scenario? I've read you should respond mainly to the "lead" interviewer (typically the hiring manager) with a courtesy note to HR. But everyone -- in particular, all of the managers -- asked me questions ... there wasn't a clear "leader", and I'm pretty sure they're all peers.

My guess is I should write a note to each of the technical managers and probably the HR representative as well. In writing to the technical managers, I should ask them to forward my thanks to their team members.

  • I am still waiting for "thank you" notes from those I interviewed and hired, years after the fact - the only time I ever got acknowledged is when they asked me to be their reference for their next job :) – Vietnhi Phuvan May 17 '14 at 15:23
2

It doesn't hurt to send a thank you to everyone you interview with, whether they have a strong say in the hiring or not. It is also ok to only send it to the main interviewers involved, but thanks are never a bad thing. It can be fairly short. You can add a question if you have one and they're likely to know the answer, or just give a quick thanks for them taking the time and reiterating your interest in the position.

Send it via email: postal mail is not necessary and is also slower. However, wait at least a couple of hours or even a day before sending it; take time to think about the interview and what you learned about the position.

Thank you for the opportunity to meet with you and the other engineers today at Acme, Inc. I like the approach you're taking with just-in-time design and look forward to learning more about widget implementation.

MyName and contact info

7

Thank you notes are very culture dependent - in 20 years of interviewing on the UK, from both sides of the fence, I've neither sent nor received a thank you note.

1

You should send thank you letters to only the people who have a deciding vote on whether you will be hired or not.

If you are overambitious, you could consider mailing a letter to everyone you spoke to, but it's not necessary.

Ultimately, it's up to you to decide who you want to mail. Good luck!

1

If you are asking from the United States, the general rule of thumb is to send thank-yous to anyone with whom you interviewed. With the growth in popularity and usage of email, there is no need to send handwritten letters-- however, you should write an individualized letter to each interviewer.

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