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In my current employer recruitment looks like this: team members go to interview with candidate. Later team talks about who that was (name), where it works now, who maybe worked there previously, how the interview went or even get a copy of CV. It's totaly not OK for the candidate and it violates law (especially GDPR things, I'm in Europe).

Now I'm on the other side of the table and I'm looking for the job. I supose that other companies handle things the same way - as soon as my proposal lands there, everybody knows that.

What's wrong with it? I don't want my current employer to know that I'm looking for new job. And people from my possible new company may tell people from my current company that I was there on an interview and I become "uncertain", "searching" etc.

This is obviously disclosure of my personal data. Should I inform the first line recruiter (that is when sending my offer email, or the first HR telephone call human) explicitly that "I really care about privacy of my proposal and disclosure is not welcome"? This is kind of obvious, but once it happens, even if they will admit to be sorry - the milk has spilled.

EDIT about passing candidate data around: It's OK to pass CV around for people intended to be in interview process. It's NOK to pass it to people not involved in it - especially it's NOK to spread word outside of company, e.g. during private / business talks with other people - this violates GDPR and is simply put not fair. So for example you can pass CV to other team member to evaluate it; but you can't pass it to colleague from other department with note "hey I think you know this candidate wife"; and can't read somebody's CV aloud in 100 people open space and laugh at it (I've seen this happening, it was before GDPR was intrduced but this is true).

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    "It's totaly not OK for the candidate and it violates law (especially GDPR things, I'm in Europe)." Who told you that? It's not true, and it's perfectly fine to pass around (within the company) CV of a candidate who applied for a job. – Tymoteusz Paul Jan 20 at 12:03
  • see my edit as you probably misunderstood "pass CV around" – Marian Paździoch Jan 20 at 12:09
  • I don't see how your edit changed the point Tymoteusz brought up – Bee Jan 20 at 12:11
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    Your question has flawed base though, as what they do, including talking about the fact that you've applied does not violate any gdpr laws that I know off, and I did GDPR compliance few times. So if you don't want them to know that it's you who applies, put your name as John Doe, and then use a different one for the contract. But the realm where you can benefit of using your real name, and for people to not know how that it's you, doesn't exist. – Tymoteusz Paul Jan 20 at 12:27
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    This question seems more like a rant than an answerable question. – joeqwerty Jan 20 at 12:48
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So I am no expert on GDPR so I am not sure whether this is really not allowed.

This means that you cannot ensure that it does not happen. However you can always politely ask. I have witnessed several times for instance that the name of a new (already hired employee) was still not shared with the rest of that future employee's team because that person had not yet announced their departure at their current job (its a small world in my field). So they were granted some privacy at their own request.

So say that your departure may be sensitive (or even a more vague statement) and request that they handle your application with care. But I am afraid that is all you can do.

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How to ensure privacy of job change?

If you are applying to a halfway decent company, there is really nothing you need to do. Most companies are very concerned about the privacy of their candidates and manage this well. It's in their own best interest: if they leak an application, the candidate will most likely be mad and withdraw. If word gets out no one will apply anymore.

as soon as my proposal lands there, everybody knows that.

No. Only the people that are directly involved with the interview process will know. Most companies are very concerned with candidate privacy. For example, if I get scheduled for an interview my calendar invite easy "Interview with JS" and not "Interview with Jane Smith" so we don't accidentally disclose the candidate name to someone looking at my calendar.

And people from my possible new company may tell people from my current company

Absolutely not. In most companies that would be considered disclosure of confidential business data and is a fire-able offense. It would also be very stupid. Don't apply to a stupid companies.

Should I inform the first line recruiter (that is when sending my offer email, or the first HR telephone call human) explicitly that "I really care about privacy of my proposal and disclosure is not welcome"?

It certainly doesn't harm. "Please don't share my application with people outside your company?" or something like this is sufficient.

So overall, the key is to make sure you only apply to companies that behave "normal" and are not outright dysfunctional. If you do a little bit of research upfront (Google, Glassdoor) you will be fine.

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