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I work for a company where a coworker that is at a lower position than me makes the same money as me. I have 4x more responsibilites than him but yet he makes the same amount. I understand that I may have lowballed my salary but I would like to address this with my employer and HR. What should be my next steps?

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You are going to want to speak to your manager, and HR, but before you do, do the following.

When you find out your worth, and how in demand you are in the industry, you can arrange a meeting with HR and your manager to see about a bump in salary if what you are being paid goes against what you've researched. Have a solid number you wish to be paid, start a bit higher than that, and come down if need be, but see what you can get that way.

You don't negotiate based on what your coworker is getting, plain and simple. You see what the industry standard is, what the demand is, and where you fit.

If you compare yourself to a coworker, and that coworker is ALSO underpaid, you may still be underpaid. If your coworker is overpaid, you could go in cutting your own throat by making an unreasonable demand.

You want to walk in knowing what you're worth and how hard it will be to find another job because knowing this will allow you to negotiate from a position of strength. You will be able to quote numbers, and, if need be, go somewhere else if you don't get satisfaction. Believe me, HR knows the difference between someone who knows they want more, and someone who knows they are worth more, just by how they hold themselves. Be the one who knows he is worth more.

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    Was going to write an answer, but I basically would have said exactly this. Your power in negotiations is your ability to walk away to a better paid job somewhere else. If you don't do the research and put the feelers out to see if you can get a better offer somewhere else, then you don't have any power, regardless as to how unjust the situation may feel. – berry120 Feb 2 at 21:08
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    I had a colleague, who would each year do a couple of interviews and get offers then go in to the service manager and come out with a raise... He was the top man in the shop, so if the service manager wanted to keep him he had to raise the pay - not always apparently to the same level as some of the offers but an agreed amount. Going in with correct & solid info wins you the game. But you also have to be prepared to move otherwise you loose all leverage. – Solar Mike Feb 3 at 8:08
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    @SolarMike that sounds like a great way to earn a reputation as someone who needs to be got rid of because they're constantly looking. – dwizum Feb 3 at 14:11
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    @dwizum as solar mike said. If you're worth it, you can negotiate – Old_Lamplighter Feb 3 at 14:35
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    @dwizium It really depends. There's a massive difference, for example, between walking into a negotiation saying "match this offer or I quit", and walking in saying "I've been looking around to find out what the market rate for my skills and experience is, these are some of the offers I've had" and then having a negotiation with those offers as a starting point. – Kaz Feb 3 at 16:59
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I work for a company where a coworker that is at a lower position than me makes the same money as me.

Stop comparing your compensation package to those of your coworkers. Everyone negotiates their compensation for themselves.

If you feel like this is unfair and/or that you're underpaid then go to your manager and negotiate a raise.

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    What's wrong with comparing one's compensation to those of other people? Market research is one of the things one does when looking for a job... – Igor G Feb 2 at 21:17
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    @IgorG because unless you're doing the payroll you shouldn't know what they make, and if you think you do, it might be wrong third hand information. Also some places have pay scales, everyone in a division gets the same regardless. – Kilisi Feb 2 at 22:22
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    @IgorG you don't negotiate based on what your coworker is getting, plain and simple. You see what the industry standard is, what the demand is, and where you fit. If you compare yourself to a coworker, and that coworker is ALSO underpaid, you may still be underpaid. If your coworker is overpaid, you could go in cutting your own throat. There's more, but those should be good starts – Old_Lamplighter Feb 2 at 23:52
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    Then this should more clearly say that you should compare on an industry level, not just compared to coworkers. But I see nothing wrong with comparing with coworkers here--even if your company underpays overall, if you have a desire to stay there, you can still make a case for getting a higher pay and they'll probably underpay you less. I want $X because Mrs. Y earns $Z is not going to fly well, but even just knowing that someone with no responsibility earns $Z means you can better gauge how much you can ask for and reasonably expect to receive – Mars Feb 3 at 6:02
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    @dwizum good idea – Old_Lamplighter Feb 3 at 14:36

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