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I came across a job I am interested to apply to in an international public organization. i.e. it is an organization whose funding comes from governments from many countries. Therefore they have strict protocols on how job applications must be done and should have some degree of transparency.

I found however, for this job they made impossible to apply online. Also, their tool to report frauds is not working (intentionally?). They do not answer emails either.

Is there anything I can still do to apply for this position?

By the way, I submitted another question in StackExchange Legal to get to know if any legal actions can be taken on this: https://law.stackexchange.com/questions/48770/can-this-be-considered-legally-a-fraud-from-a-united-nations-organization

  • I found however, for this job they made impossible to apply online can you elaborate? – Sourav Ghosh Feb 4 at 7:03
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    Why do you have to assume it's a fraud and not simply a mistake??? I think you're going waaaaay too far. – Adriano Repetti Feb 4 at 8:07
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    You keep using the word "fraud" but I'm not sure you know what it means. – motosubatsu Feb 4 at 12:20
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    There are some situations in life where picking up the phone and calling someone is the best way to get a response. If the application portal seems broken, and you aren't getting responses to emails, have you tried calling them? – dwizum Feb 4 at 14:55
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    Also - I read your post on Law.SE, which provides more context. Have you considered that they may have advertised the position publicly through other channels, back before the November "close date?" You seem hung up on proving that they are committing fraud because they couldn't possibly have received any legitimate applications, but I'm wondering if there may have been applications coming in through channels you're not aware of (which would invalidate your claim.) – dwizum Feb 4 at 15:11
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Whether you can actually "apply" or not will largely depend on which is the accurate closing date, but since that needs to be determined the steps to take are the same.

Compose a polite email to jobs@unops.org (the e-mail address was cunningly hidden on their "contact us" page, gotta watch out for those wily fraudsters and their tricks! The blurb above that address even includes the words "If you experience any issues when applying for a vacancy, please get in touch with our recruitment team" to really throw you off the scent!) expressing an interest in applying for the position and that the job posting on their site seems to be closed despite the Stack Overflow advert indicating differently. Don't mention the word "fraud", don't go riding in on your flaming Karen-chariot demanding to speak to the manager and for the love of all that is right and good in the world don't fling threats of siccing lawyers on them.

Firstly because it's extremely unlikely that this constitutes "fraud" in any shape or form, and secondly even if it did, bringing hostile legal action against an organisation about the recruitment process is just never a great opening to the, well recruitment process. Unless I missed that chapter in How to Make Friends and Influence People.

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  • A very poorly read book that (How to make friends ...), plus 1. – Solar Mike Feb 4 at 12:52
  • Thank you for your answer. Basically I had already done what you suggested but they did not react. – Worker Feb 5 at 8:18
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    @Worker Then I think sadly it's time to shrug your shoulders and move on. – motosubatsu Feb 5 at 14:53
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Is there anything I can still do to apply for this position?

As you've seen the company responsiveness (or lack thereof) at the recruitment phase itself - question is do you really want to go ahead and work for this organization?

I can understand this seems like a good opportunity / match for you - but a job is not a one-time stint, you need to ensure you get a good working environment. From the description, this organization does not appear to be a good one at that.

Imagine if a candidate has made similar mistakes in their application data / resume - what will be the company impression regarding the candidate? Certainly not a positive one. Same is applicable here also - they are not careful to post a proper job post, they do not respond to emails, their support system does not function as usual - taken all together, seems like a read flag to me.

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    Good point. In principle yes I want since if I'd get the job I would not be necessarily dealing with the people involved in the fraud. But it's a good point. – Worker Feb 4 at 7:08
  • Dear Downvoter, along with the downvote, if you can leave a comment mentioning what is not useful about the answer, and how it can possibly be improved, it'll be helpful. Thanks. – Sourav Ghosh Feb 4 at 13:19
  • I didn't downvote. But - although I understand the point you're making - I would hesitate to count this as a red flag strong enough to disqualify the potential employer. One of my all time favorite employers was incredibly hard to actually contact and didn't do well at responding to job applications (they gave me zero response or acknowledgement of my application for months before finally calling me for an interview. I had actually assumed their online application portal was somehow broken and had written them off). – dwizum Feb 4 at 14:54
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    @dwizum I also see the point you're making, however two things: (1) OP already tried contacting the with no avail. (2) there's no single point which counts as red flag alone - it's the combination of multiple ones which seems to be problematic. My conclusions were based on those two cases, primarily. – Sourav Ghosh Feb 4 at 14:57
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    I do agree with you that in this particular scenario it seems like the employer and the candidate are a bad fit for each other. – dwizum Feb 4 at 14:59

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