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I have a single start-up app with multiple broadly-related features that solve unrelated problems with unrelated solutions

Keeping in mind the audience attention, should I present the typical topics with the following order in the pitch deck:

  1. Introduction
  2. Problems (which happen to be unrelated to each other)
  3. Solutions (which also happen to be unrelated to each other)
  4. Product (and its features)

or can I assess each problem separately with its corresponding related solution as a feature in my app. Proposed rearrangement of topics in the pitch deck:

  1. Introduction
  2. Each problem and a feature that solves this problem
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    Problem-solution pairs seem like it would be better as people generally don't have long attention spans, especially during pitches. But if these features aren't related to each other, why are they in the same product? – Mars Feb 5 '20 at 3:02
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I have a single start-up app with multiple broadly-related features that solve unrelated problems with unrelated solutions

Are there really no linking elements whatsoever between either problem / solution pair beyond the broadly related features? If so it seems a bit odd having them in the same app to begin with.

Presumably you have some justification for putting both sets of functionality in the same app - and I think that's an important aspect to consider for your presentation, otherwise the audience will also just be thinking "that's a bit weird having those features lumped together."

I would therefore introduce one problem/solution set, then explain the relationship to the second problem/solution set and the justification of them being in the same app, before moving onto the next problem/solution set.

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tl;dr. Respect your prospects' time. Keep your pitch short and sweet. Don't show all your slides.

You need to work out and memorize a so-called "elevator pitch," a 30-second verbal statement of how your product solves a real and interesting problem or two.

Your presentation will best be organized as problem / solution ; problem / solution ; problem / solution.

Then, start your presentations with a conversation with your prospective customers about their problems. Tailor your presentation in the moment to how you can solve their problems.

Many peoples' attention wanes after the second powerpoint slide. So keep it succinct. You don't have to show every slide you create.

I've had good success with a very short presentation with these slides

  1. Logo, URL, mission of product.
  2. Problem and solution
  3. Problem and solution
  4. Logo, URL, contact.

I've chosen to show either 2 or 3 based on my understand of the prospect's problems.

I have more slides in the deck with details to help answer detailed questions.

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