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Sometimes I report an issue, with my complaint supported by hard evidence (emails, documents, witnesses) but I do not get acknowledgement of the matter from a manager.

Example 1: not being paid on time, ever, but a random number of days after the date (e.g. contract says 27th, I get paid the following week).

Example 2: colleague guilty of omission or blatantly lying, supported by data, emails and witnesses (e.g. "I pushed my new code yesterday", github doesn't show anything for the last week or for today)

In some cases, I report this to my manager and he just says it's not a problem, or it's not... anything.

Example 1: "I am being paid late, it's been like this for six months, here are the statements", "you are being paid anyway"

Example 2: "code was not submitted, and we were planning to review it today", "then you have to change your plans, if it was urgent you should have prepared a plan B ahead of time"

The question is: How to handle a conversation where your manager does not address the evidence presented for a complaint or report?

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    It's not that he's not addressing it, to me it seems like he feels attacked and tries to weasel his way out of it. To be honest, when it gets to the point of someone looking what time a branch was pushed, there's little hope for trust to be re-established. Add to that the response you got, which amounts to go fuck yourself (if you pardon my French), it's high time to escalate above the manager.
    – rath
    Feb 7 '20 at 11:20
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    Is your manager responsible for paying you? What did you expect him to do about the code not being submitted, you obviously weren't going to be able to review it and he can't fix that
    – cdkMoose
    Feb 7 '20 at 13:48
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    Please don't assume the manager isn't listening just because they don't tell you what they plan to do about a problem you raise. Dishonest employees are a huge headache for managers, and how the manager deals with them is not your business.
    – O. Jones
    Feb 7 '20 at 16:31
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How to handle a conversation where your manager does not address the evidence presented for a complaint or report?

When reporting an issue you should, if possible, clearly state how you want this issue to be fixed. This will leave the manager fewer chances to wriggle their way out of unpleasant question (assuming a malevolent manager), or this will save both of you some misunderstanding (assuming the manager genuinely misinterpreted the intention of those reports).

So you could try:

  1. I am being paid late, it's been like this for six months, here are the statements. Could you make sure I'll be paid on due date in the future?


  1. Code was not submitted, and we were planning to review it today. I want the guy who lied about submitting it yesterday fired. (just guessing here, because frankly it's not quite clear to me how you wanted the manager to handle it, once it's already happened)

TLDR: A clear request would make it more difficult to give a dismissive answer.

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    Please don't tell a manager how to do their job. Nothing good can come from demanding that somebody be fired. If a co-worker is doing poor work that makes it hard for you to do your work, simply point out to the manager that you're waiting, or having to do extra work.
    – O. Jones
    Feb 7 '20 at 16:34
  • Thanks for this answer, it's very helpful.
    – Monoandale
    Feb 7 '20 at 21:00
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Not to be flippant, but the way to handle this is by getting a new job and quitting. Pay being consistently late is a pretty big red flag.

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    Not necessarily. If pay is consistently a week behind where OP expected, maybe they didn't realise they're working a week in lieu or something. In any case, this sounds like something to initially question with the payroll department or HR before going for the nuclear option of just outright quitting. There might be a fair and logical reason for this.
    – delinear
    Feb 7 '20 at 12:22
  • Well, there is a difference between "the money is late as per contract" and "as per my expectations". Obviously if it is within contract terms but after expectations - the expectations are wrong. Otherwise it IS a red flag.
    – TomTom
    Feb 7 '20 at 18:35
  • Indeed, that came from some startup I worked for and it was a red flag for many reasons.
    – Monoandale
    Feb 7 '20 at 21:00
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Example 1: not being paid on time, ever, but a random number of days after the date (e.g. contract says 27th, I get paid the following week).

Do you have the contract in hand that says you will be paid on the 27th? Also keep in mind there are a lot of factors to consider here that could be out of your employer's hands. The 27th can fall on a weekend or holiday as well. For example, if your company uses an outside payroll department, it could be that they submit to them on the 27th but it takes them a business day to process and submit. Also, the company I work for uses this payroll company that deposits every Wednesday then I see it in my bank on Friday.

My advice is to go to your manager explain you are expecting to get paid on the 27th as per the contract and want an explanation as to why you aren't getting paid on that day.

Example 2: colleague guilty of omission or blatantly lying, supported by data, emails and witnesses (e.g. "I pushed my new code yesterday", github doesn't show anything for the last week or for today)

This isn't really your problem. The one thing anyone hates is a tattletale. Someone who tries to point out other people's fault or get them into trouble for no good reason other than just being annoying. My advice is to present material factually as possible. Do you work, and let others do their work. If both your work need to coincide with each other, then be factual about it. Github has an excellent commenting and pull request logging than other systems out there. Simply make your PR, state you are waiting for commit from person X, then you're set. If your coworker is late for reasons, then your manager would see that in the comment. The evidence is right there for them to see and take action upon. No need for you to point them out. If you're asked why the product was late, say you made a PR request and was waiting on X and he committed the following day. Then end it right there. Don't try to make your coworker look foolish or say he's lying to everyone.

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  • Thanks for the answer.
    – Monoandale
    Feb 7 '20 at 21:01

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