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I gave 1 month's notice in my resignation letter. I finally resigned from the company but didn't receive salary the work day after resignation. I asked a former colleague who had resigned previously and she told me she was paid her outstanding salary for the month she left at he end of the month even though she left about 2 weeks before she was paid her outstanding salary. So it's seen that the company has a strategy of paying salary only at the end of every month even after their staff resign.

I have bills to pay and I need the salary yet to be paid and it is obviously unfair if they have to make me wait for another 3 weeks to receive the salary for the work done even though I had given them one month notice before resignation.

How do I politely and professionally write an email requesting for my outstanding salary letting them know it's unfair to make me wait another 3 weeks because of their company policy of only making all payments once just at the end of the month which I just got to know about after previously giving 1 month notice before resigning and letting them know I have bills to settle.

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    To make it clear, you are expecting the company to pay you outside of the normal payroll period after you resigned?
    – user34687
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 3:52
  • Okay, I understand you...Thank you Joe
    – user114471
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 7:40

2 Answers 2

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I have bills to pay and I need the salary yet to be paid and it is obviously unfair if they have to make me wait for another 3 weeks to receive the salary for the work done even though I had given them one month notice before resignation.

But you must have already accounted for receiving monthly paychecks when paying your bills. So, it appears that nothing is different now.

How do I politely and professionally write an email requesting for my outstanding salary letting them know it's unfair to make me wait another 3 weeks

Since you were used to being paid at the end of the month, it doesn't seem to me to be unfair to wait until the end of the month to get your pay again.

If you want to try, just send a polite note and ask if you could get it sooner, now that you are no longer part of the company. You might wish to omit the term "unfair".

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    Everywhere I have worked in my 25 years of holding down jobs, final wage packets were done on the same payroll period as if the person had not resigned - if your notice period ended the day after the last payroll period, then you waited a month for 1 days wages. If it ended 2 weeks in, then you waited half a month for 2 weeks wages. Etc etc etc. The company here is doing nothing abnormal here - running random payrolls throughout the month just because someone left can get expensive for them.
    – user34687
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 3:54
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    oh.....thanks Moo..I understand you
    – user114471
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 7:46
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Go that web site below:

Citizensinformation.ie website is an Irish eGovernment initiative, and was originally established under the Government's first action plan for the Information Society

https://www.citizensinformation.ie/en/employment/employment_rights_and_conditions/pay_and_employment/leaving_work_without_being_paid.html

According to them, "if you lose your job" your employer is required by law to pay you on your last day. With that said, you didn't really lose your job, you quit. So I'm not sure if this really applies to you.

You should just call the Workplace Relations Commission they suggest you call, and ask for their advice. Their number and their office hours are at the bottom of that web page I gave you.

With that said, if there is no law compelling them to pay you earlier, you should just try to ask them nicely and politely to make an exception for you. But be nice, don't say that it's "unfair". Nobody wants to do someone a favor when they're being blamed for something. Just say that you've made a huge mistake. You didn't plan things properly.

Take full responsibility for assuming the wrong thing in the first place and not double-checking that assumption, and then ask them if they'd be willing to make an exception and pay you earlier than originally scheduled. Ideally, make this request over the phone, if you're nice about it, it will be harder to turn you down if you make this request over the phone.

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  • @user114471, Please update us on what they tell you. Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 8:48
  • "Citizens information" and similar sites tend to be very vague and imprecise. My company has to pay me before the last working day of the month, every month, so I assume that is the date when they owe me money, not the day when I quit. You'd need an actual law site for this.
    – gnasher729
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 11:06
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    That site is a good source of information. Obviously it won't be able to tell you the conditions of your specific contract.
    – Eric Nolan
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 11:30
  • What is the meaning of the first sentence?
    – guest
    Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 16:34
  • @gnasher729, According to the web itself: "Citizensinformation.ie website is an Irish eGovernment initiative, and was originally established under the Government's first action plan for the Information Society." In other words, he should just call them and ask for their advice. They will ask him about his contract if it's relevant. Commented Feb 11, 2020 at 17:19

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