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Apologies if this question starts a discussion, but I would like to be answered to the point (even pointing out to me that I might be wrong here).

The situation:

  1. I work in a very dynamic organization where you build the parachute after jumping off the cliff. Everywhere you see, it's bandaging.

  2. There is huge potential for growth within the organization.

  3. I am good at my work and have received good feedback from my end-customers.

  4. My immediately reporting manager behaves in a way I find it to be very disrespectful and condescending to me. Few of the things:

  5. He is 'get it done' kind of guy. He never plans, calls randomly anytime during the day, ask for random favor in terms of work, never is available to discuss when I want to, commit what is not possible, changes commitment on the fly, etc.

  6. If asked as to why do I have to work over the weekend or not ask for raise or not ask for travel allowances, etc, he would generally respond, see I am also not asking for these things, or there are people who are getting paid less than you, etc. etc. Or he would say, it is not under my control and go and talk to so and so.

  7. I really am very vocal and upfront about his way of working. Hence I feel left out. Few of my colleagues are OK with these situations and hence I feel that he is sidelining me. He would not take my call, but the next second if my colleague sitting beside me call, he would respond to them. He would talk to me by talking to the third guy (ask his so and so and let me know)

  8. I have tried talking to him multiple times, but somehow none of the conversations ever ends up with a solution. I might also be at fault here because I feel he is never ready to listen and hence I don't express much of my frustration.

  9. I like the organization and I see huge growth, but I am afraid if I am under this guy, I would be missing the bus big time.

  10. I overall think he is a good technical person, but a very bad manager.

Question:

  1. What approach should I follow to handle this situation? It has been over a year.

  2. I have a good network with his seniors and they trust me and see my work. I would really like to explain to them what I am going through, but I am afraid if this would consider jumping the line? Do you think I should express my opinion to my super bosses?

  3. What is the best course to raise this concern to the super bosses?

  • What do you want as an end goal? You are asking whether to make an issue out of it, but not what is the result you want. – Tymoteusz Paul Feb 18 at 9:00
  • Is asking for a transfer to another team an option? – Charmander Feb 18 at 9:14
  • @TymoteuszPaul - now that you ask, I am not sure myself what I want.. I still have to think. I dont want to create an issue out of it that I am sure. – Vicyan Feb 18 at 9:54
  • @Charmander - I am thinking of going that approach. I had it enough of the situation – Vicyan Feb 18 at 9:54
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He is 'get it done' kind of guy. He never plans, calls randomly anytime during the day, ask for random favor in terms of work, never is available to discuss when I want to, commit what is not possible, changes commitment on the fly, etc.

None of that is necessarily an issue (or not necessarily your issue, anyway.) You just need to learn to work with it. Breaking those points down:

He never plans

Not your problem, as long as you plan your workload carefully.

calls randomly anytime during the day

Fine as long as it's in working hours. If it's not, then don't answer. Don't set the precedent that you're around and available for work in your own time. If he asks where you were, then you can just give a vague answer. Your personal time is none of his business.

ask for random favor in terms of work

Again, no problem if that's in working hours. You just need to prioritise, and make it clear that his "favours" mean dropping other work you were doing previously.

never is available to discuss when I want to

Book a meeting in the calendar. If he doesn't show, ask him why he didn't show and rebook it. Do this persistently to make it clear you're not going away..

commit what is not possible, changes commitment on the fly, etc.

Not your problem. If he asks you to commit what isn't possible, just push back, eg:

Sorry boss, there's absolutely no way that work can get done by Friday. I'll drop you a time estimate for it later on if you like, but at the moment it's looking like it's not going to be ready until at least Tuesday the following week. How would you like me to proceed?

...and make sure all the above is in writing, so you have a paper trail if things hit the fan.

If asked as to why do I have to work over the weekend or not ask for raise or not ask for travel allowances, etc, he would generally respond, see I am also not asking for these things, or there are people who are getting paid less than you, etc. etc. Or he would say, it is not under my control and go and talk to so and so.

Again, separate points there.

  • If weekend work is in your contract, afraid that's what you've signed up for. If it's not, then it's your time, not his, and he has to persuade you to work over the weekend (time off in lieu, extra pay, etc.) and that's entirely your decision. Don't be a pushover. Make up some plans if you have to.
  • If not getting a raise is an issue, your bargaining power is your ability to walk elsewhere. Have a look around, potentially get another better paid offer from elsewhere, and if they still refuse, leave.
  • 1
    Thanks, I think I agree with most of your points and I, in fact, do all of them. My problem is because I am doing this (speaking for myself), I am being sidelined. For ex., if there is a new assignment coming, he is not interested in giving it to me unless he has no option. Since we don't have much visibility within the organization and he has authority, he is not questioned on this. All in all, it is hurting me, which is bad. Thanks for your answer anyways! – Vicyan Feb 18 at 9:52
  • "not your problem" ?! That is exactly the point, that everything the boss is doing (according to the description) is a problem. In the first place he creates chaos and disrupts the work of the people. That is the opposite of what a boss should do. – virolino Feb 18 at 11:24
  • @virolino I think you've missed the point of my answer. I'm not extolling the virtues of this boss - he sounds awful. But in these situations, the ability to make sure those problems stay with the boss, not you is a very important skill to both develop and enforce. – berry120 Feb 18 at 11:30
  • I only read what you wrote. And you wrote "not (your) problem" at least 3 times. How did I actually get it wrong? – virolino Feb 18 at 11:33
  • @virolino ...because it's not (OP's) problem. The issue is that the boss is making it the OP's problem, and the right thing to do there, IMHO, is to push back and make sure the problem stays with the boss. If you feel that's unclear, I'm happy to accept edits. – berry120 Feb 18 at 11:38

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