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I currently work within the supply chain department of a relatively large child company to a major corporation. I came into my role by working hard, learning quickly, and being noticed by global and plant leadership. The global supply chain director created the position for me with support from VP of ops.

Since I have been in my position the company has paid for me to obtain my CPIM (Certified in Production and Inventory Management). I am starting school this fall. I have 0 college credits so it will take me some time and dedication to complete this. I was hired with no college, and no certifications that would qualify me for this position.

With that being said, does it make sense to expect a raise upon completion? Or could this question potentially ruin my chances to further my career within the company?

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  • Are you currently paid less than someone in a similar role would receive?
    – Mars
    Commented Feb 19, 2020 at 1:36
  • are you worried to look greedy? as in "we paid for your CPIM and now you are asking for more money, how dare you!" Commented Feb 19, 2020 at 21:11

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I was hired with no college, and no certifications that would qualify me for this position. With that being said, does it make sense to expect it? Or could this question potentially ruin my chances to further my career within the company?

If I understand correctly, you already have the job and are liked by leadership. And they are paying you to obtain this certification. So it seems unlikely to ruin your career chances to ask a question.

In most cases, a raise wouldn't be automatic - or they would have already told you so. If I had to guess, I'd guess they will tell you that completing the certification puts you in a better position for raises and promotions.

But I doubt it would hurt to ask. And that's the only way you'd know ahead of time.

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    I mostly like this answer. If they didn't tell OP there was a raise coming, then the raise will never be automatic. They have no reason to decide randomly to pay someone more if they're already willing to accept the lower wage. Also, if it would hurt to ask, you don't want to work there anyway. Commented Feb 19, 2020 at 22:51
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Should you expect it? No. You shouldn't expect anything to happen... either way.

That being said, they've made a commitment to and an investment in your professional and career growth with them, so maybe wait until you've completed your studies and see where that takes you at this company. If after what you think is a sufficient amount of time you're not being compensated at the level you think you deserve then engage in that conversation.

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It probably depends on one important factor:

Are you currently paid less than someone in a similar role?

If the answer is yes, then when your qualifications and experience match, you should expect pay matching your qualifications/certifications and experience.

If not, then it is likely the company is treating you as an investment, taking a loss now and expecting at least a period of time where you're producing more than your payrate, to balance things out. I wouldn't be surprised if you were told something along the lines of "you'll qualify for raises the year after you finish your certification."

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  • Any company doing that is basically telling you that you could earn more money by leaving. If they plan to do that, they typically lock you in with a contract where you promise to repay the cost of the training if you leave within a year or two. Commented Feb 19, 2020 at 13:29
  • @RobinBennett Not every company will use a contract. There are still many parts of the world where people rely on others' sense of gratitude, duty, etc.
    – Mars
    Commented Feb 20, 2020 at 2:01
  • They might not even externally/publicly say that that is their policy either. They may just consider these things when it comes time to calculate the next pay-rate
    – Mars
    Commented Feb 20, 2020 at 2:02

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