8

I began work for a company on April 2019 from shift 7AM to 4PM. I am warehouse worker. After 3 months my manager told me to start 6AM to 3PM.

I had no issues with this but has problems have arose during these last 5 weeks as my is wife is pregnant. As she does not drive I have to drive her to work...this has made me late a couple of times.

My boss has disciplined me for coming in late during these weeks. I have asked if I can start at a later time...say 6:30AM or 6:45AM but this request has been declined several times. I feel that even starting at 7AM the warehouse operations will not be affected. I am the lone warehouse worker from 6AM to 7AM.

How should I solve this issue as it is affecting my family and my employment?

  • 6
    Can you expand on this a little... How does the pregnancy play into this? You were taking her to work before yes? Is it that she's having trouble getting going in the morning? Normally the answer to lateness questions is just "get started as early as you need to get yourself in there," so if you want more nuance you'll need to explain the factors here a bit more. – mxyzplk - SE stop being evil Feb 27 at 23:49
  • 2
    How are you actually making the request to start later? We don't want to suggest arguments you've already made and don't work. – BSMP Feb 28 at 0:12
  • 2
    Location? Labor laws vary from place to place. – nick012000 Feb 28 at 0:20
  • 3
    Does your contract give your employer the power to change your hours depending on operational requirements? Or is it stated that you will only work the set hours with no flexibility mentioned. – solarflare Feb 28 at 0:38
21

You have asked and been declined. You have three options.

  1. Both get up earlier so that everyone gets to work on time. This is the ideal solution as you take care of the issue in-house without involving workplaces. Most people handle it internally.

  2. Or escalate the issue and take your concerns higher up the hierarchy in your company. This may be declined or make you a target for more discipline.

  3. Or find a job which has more suitable hours. Failing the first two options this is sometimes the best way, but of course, sometimes jobs are not that easy to come by.

I see option 1 as the best solution because it's an immediate fix, causes no outside drama, has no serious potential repercussions with the job, and involves less effort than the other two to achieve a positive outcome.

You have already been disciplined at least once, so option 2 is a risky coin toss, and option 3 isn't always easy, takes time and could be a lot of effort.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Yeah... I mean I want to be sensitive to the fact the wife is probably pushing back real hard on him and that's a lot of marital stress. But in the end it's a condition of him keeping that job., And I really never like employees with the "I need to be out my wife doesn't drive" story, I'm like "this isn't 1950, and this also isn't my problem." – mxyzplk - SE stop being evil Feb 28 at 1:27
  • 4
    Maybe his wife is legally blind and is unable to drive. Maybe a medical condition is preventing her from being able to drive. Can't really jump to conclusions – Monstar Feb 28 at 1:56
  • 2
    @Monstar Whatever the reason the wife can't drive is irrelevant; they can get up earlier so he can be on time to work. Or she can Uber. – Andy Feb 28 at 2:10
  • 5
    I wouldn't call 'do exactly as your employer wants and suck up the disadvantages in your personal life' as the 'ideal solution'. It is certainly a possibility but I think the whole point of OPs question is that he does not consider that the ideal solution and is looking for alternatives. – quarague Feb 28 at 8:28
  • 4
    I read all three options and it's good that you gave all three. I just questioned that you singled out one of the three as the ideal solution and I don't see this option as the ideal one. – quarague Feb 28 at 9:27

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .