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I've been working for this company for three years and due to recent restructure my manager has decided to leave and I have been offered the opportunity to take over his role once he leaves.

So my question is should I be chasing him to provide me with a handover, i.e. show and explain the different aspects of his role and request training. Or should he be taking the time to show and provide me with as much information, training and insight to successfully undertake this role.

I sent him an email to request a sit to discuss this role, with the main objective that I get to know all about the different aspects of the role and to devise a plan to ensure the transition goes as smoothly as possible but this is the response I got....

I’m not keen to explain my role that way.

Effort should come from you and you should drafting first what you think would be your role.

Sorry, I won’t make the job for you.

Hence, we won’t have meeting tomorrow but better next week same day, same time with your draft.

How do I respond to something like this? Correct me if I'm wrong or being completely stupid but isn't drafting something to what I think my role should be, basically the job description given to me when I was offered this role?

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I would not rely on the person you are replacing. It happens very often in the situations where they simply do not care to put in the time or effort, so if you want to effectively take over then I would drive it as much as possible. Even to the point of speaking with who will be your supervisor and asking what their expectations will be for you in your new role. Good luck!

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Talk to the boss of the manager you're replacing about the hand off. Ask them how they think it should be handled since they are likely the ones in charge of how it should be handled. If necessary get their response in writing and forward it to the manager you're replacing.

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    Yes, this and more. I'd start the conversation off with "I'm excited about the new role, but the transition might be rougher than necessary. X has told me he's not keen on explaining his current duties to me. Would you please provide me with a general list of duties, so I don't overlook an important aspect of the position?" Indicate that it's OK if the duties are general, but you don't want to neglect a not-front-and-center part of your job. Your boss will read between the lines. He'll know that no ex-manager transition is being done. – Edwin Buck Mar 11 at 14:17

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