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Some of my team members worked in a project in amazing way.

We managed to deliver on time and these guys worked day and night to achieve that.

I would like to send a Thank you email recognising the effort they gave CCing the senior manager.

My concern is that, will that make the other employees who did not work on this project not happy? will that make it a must for me to send thank you email for every achievment? does that mean they have to get salary raise, bonus or any other benefits?

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  • Do you have any precedent/convention in your company for recognizing "over and above" efforts to achieve a result, such as with this project? Is there any history of people being 'not happy' because of recognition of others' achievements or are you just thinking of this as a possible outcome? – seventyeightist Mar 21 '20 at 19:45
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    I would be much more worried that such an email implies that it is okay to work day and night. Have you given appropriate overtime pay to them? Is the law okay with people working day and night? – guest Mar 21 '20 at 20:19
  • Are you new to managing a team? I applaud that you ask the question and are considering the impact to the broader team but giving feedback and performance evaluations are a pretty core element of management so I would hope that you have gotten support in learning those key skills from those above you. Do you have a mentor, ideally within the company, you can ask? And more to the point: will you be able to recognise these team members with more than just words? – Lilienthal Mar 22 '20 at 11:08
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So you are considering not to give your hard working team the credit and appreciation they deserve because you are afraid it will step on toes of collages who did not participate in this work-marathon?

Seriously just send that email and celebrate the result of the hard work. If someone is offended by this, they are the one who are grudging about your recognizing your team's hard work.

You don't have to give any bonus or salary raises but expect to be reminded of this email at next salary revision.

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  • "misogynistic"? Did you mean something else? – GendoIkari Mar 23 '20 at 14:33
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    Misogynistic? I don't think that word means what you think it does, even it is popular these days. – Jeffrey Mar 23 '20 at 16:05
  • You are right, feel free to hit the edit button to improve my language! ;-) The meaning was lost in the translation. – Simson Mar 24 '20 at 2:24
  • Is grudge a better word for this ? – Simson Mar 25 '20 at 1:12
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Don't overthink this.

Seriously, one of the biggest problems in most workplaces is that there's not enough positive reinforcement and recognition.

If someone did an awesome job? Give them a kudos!

Or put another way: At least 3 people (as I write this) upvoted Simson's answer but didn't upvote your question. Does that mean your question is bad? No - because it's simply recognizing that Simson wrote a good answer and deserves some recognition for it. And the people that upvoted Simson's answer aren't obligated to upvote everything else on the site as well.

Same thing on the job. If your coworker Alice does a great job handling some troublesome issues, would you rather she not get any kudos out of fear of upsetting you? Or would you rather she get some praise for her good work?

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  • "Give them a kudos!" No. Give them a raise, bonus, free days. – FooTheBar Mar 25 '20 at 8:09
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I once contracted at a government health organisation where people regularly slapped each other on the back and went so far as calling each other geniuses, even though their skills, experience and work ethic were ordinary to say the least. But the funniest day was when the minister had to front a parliamentary enquiry into the poor performance of our departments roll outs. All I can say is one groups exemplary performance is another groups slapstick comedy

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