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Got asked the salary expectation question in one of my recent job applications via email. I deflected the question and asked the recruiter for his range instead (not sure if this was rude or not) and got a range way higher than what I expected. I am still interviewing for this position should I just say I'm happy with the lower end of his range?

Two factors making me what to go lower than his range is that they may find someone cheaper who will disclose their range and Also I'm somewhat under qualified for this position (3 years instead of 5 they asked), or is this foolish?

  • Don't start the negotiation until they've decided to hire you. Nothing good can come out of that. Also, go on glassdoor and verify if your salary expectations are correct. – Stephan Branczyk May 21 at 23:19
  • @StephanBranczyk well the first email communication I had with them they asked for salary expectation. – pi a May 21 at 23:20
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    Yes and you did well by not showing your hand this early on in the process. Now go through the interview process and let them make an initial offer. – Stephan Branczyk May 21 at 23:21
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    @StephanBranczyk so what should I reply to the email of the recuiter disclosing the range? – pi a May 21 at 23:24
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    "That's fine. I can work with that. Here is my resume." – Stephan Branczyk May 22 at 0:23
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Say "Thank you for this information."

Why do you feel you need to make a preemptive declaration of what you're willing to accept? Wait until you're interviewed and offered the position (if that happens).

Don't appear to be desperate or willing to accept whatever they offer, unless you actually are desperate and willing to accept whatever they offer. They need a person for this position. You don't need them (again, unless you're desperate). This puts you in a position of power. Maintain that position.

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should I just say I'm happy with the lower end of his range?

Two factors making me what to go lower than his range is that they may find someone cheaper who will disclose their range and Also I'm somewhat under qualified for this position (3 years instead of 5 they asked), or is this foolish?

Companies don't seek the cheapest candidate they can find. Instead, they look for the best fit for the open position.

Go through the interview process and give it the best shot you can. If you get an offer in a range higher than you need, just accept it.

If you are uncomfortable accepting a position for which you are under qualified, then reject any offer. Otherwise accept it knowing that the company feels you meet their qualifications.

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    In fact, lowering your range may make you less attractive - this may seem counter intuitive, but the possible reasons for doing that ("I don't feel qualified") explain why. – bytepusher May 24 at 19:37
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You already gained a lot (potentially) by not telling what you thought was an Ok salary, but being told that the company is considering a much higher salary range.

Coming with low salary expectations doesn't do you any good. Your salary is not the major selling point, what you can do is. Low salary expectations say "I myself believe that I'm not very good at my job". Why would I hire you?

And now, after you gained a lot by sheer luck, you want to undo it all by telling you are looking for the lower end. That won't do you any good. Once they decided that you might be the guy they want to hire, then salary is discussed. You don't start with the lowest you'd expect, but with something higher. If they think you are worth it, great. If not, you'll be offered less, nothing lost.

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