3

I have two options in mind for a sentence:

I realized that the team I was on would also work on that migration project.

vs.

I realized my team would also work on that migration project.

I posted this on writing.stackexchange, first, and found out that at least one person thought I meant to convey that I was a manager. I was an individual contributor, so another option I considered - that I hope avoids that misunderstanding - was:

I realized our team would also work on that migration project.

Albeit I'm not sure how big of a problem using 'my' vs. 'our' is.

Edit: I thought I had written this in the other post, but I forgot to mention that the original reason for asking this was that I vaguely remembered somebody saying that if I say 'our team' or 'my team' that that sounds like I'm still mentally with the company.

Edit: Deleted writing.stackexchange post

  • 3
    I don't think you are going to get answers different from that. "My team" would normally be taken to mean the team you managed. – DJClayworth May 22 at 15:17
  • It probably doesn't matter; what is the context? The first option is probably the most clear. – Touchdown May 22 at 15:18
  • @Touchdown I'm not sure what you mean by context. The rest of the sentence is: When I saw another team working on a migration project for the customer-facing web portal which the team I was on built features in, I realized that the team I was on would also work on that migration project. – Marko Galesic May 22 at 15:21
  • Do you have a name for the team? – muasif80 May 22 at 15:49
8

"My team" on its own can imply that you were the team leader or manager.

"Team ABC", as suggested in another answer, unfortunately removes your connection to the team.

However, they is a way to provide context. You just need to make it clear what your position was in the organisation before taking about the work you and your team. As long as you make it clear at the outset, by saying something like:

While at company IntelliCo I was a developer in a team of five.

You can then refer to it as "my team" without ambiguity.

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1

If you have a name for the team like 'Team ABC' then you can phrase it like.

I realized "Team ABC" would also work on that migration project.

Otherwise I believe that in the context you are asking this the 2nd choice makes more sense, if its really to avoid being considered the manager of the team.

I realized our team would also work on that migration project.

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    "Team ABC" omits whether OP is part of that team or not. it could be clarified from the surrounding context, but based on the sentence you provided in the answer alone, I'd be more inclined to infer that this is a second team next to OP's team (since "would also work on that project" can be taken to mean they are not the only ones working on it). – Flater May 22 at 16:52

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