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When an employee is leaving a company, it's common for them to send out a group email to other employees they know to announce their departure and to share non-work contact details (personal email, LinkedIn, etc.).

To me, it would seem natural in these emails to briefly mention your future employment plans - specifically, where you're moving to next (assuming you have a new job). I've been surprised to learn that this is actually quite uncommon. This I've learned from:

  • Re-reading departure emails from people who left my current company for other companies, and realizing that they didn't mention their future employer (in all cases I knew the future employer from in person conversations).

  • Looking at departure email templates online and seeing the vast majority don't mention a future employer.

I have two questions about this:

  • Is there a reason why this is the culture?

  • If I'm leaving my current company and I do mention where I'm moving to, will this be considered strange or rude?

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    Could someone explain their downvotes please? – James Fennell May 23 at 15:43
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    When an employee is leaving a company, it's common for them to send out a group email to other employees they know to announce their departure and to share non-work contact details - It's probably not as common as you think, especially not in larger companies. To me, it would seem natural in these emails to briefly mention your future employment plans - Why? What purpose would that serve? Why would you want or need to tell people that? – joeqwerty May 23 at 16:00
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    It might also be considered to be in poor taste. When you break up with someone you don't tell all of their friends who your next girlfriend/boyfriend is do you? "I wanted to let you all know that I broke up with Jennie and am now dating Becky. Give my best to Jennie when you see her." – joeqwerty May 23 at 16:01
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    @joeqwerty - Or even more directly, writing directly to Becky: Hey Becky. You are not drop dead beautiful (you're not even close), but Jennifer is. Besides, she's a lot more fun to be with, in all regards. Bye. There's something to be said for not burning ones bridges. – David Hammen May 23 at 17:53
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In short, because you're using a company asset to promote the workplace of a different company.

Like you said in your post, you were aware of where your coworkers were going through personal conversations. Which is generally just fine (though you don't want to stray into "Dude, you should check out how great it is over there - they still have openings, you know..." territory while in the office.

But any sort of farewell email? You're sending it from your company email address. You're sending it to employees of the company. And you're sending it to their company email addresses. That's a lot of company-centric stuff... which is why you don't want to be using that to essentially advertise a different employer - after all, if it wasn't better over at XYZ, why would you be leaving ABC to go there?

Instead, the purpose of those emails isn't personal (like you said, you found out the personal details from talking with them in person.) It's to assist the company, letting employees know that any duties they were assuming you would be handling will need to be tackled by someone else.

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    Awesome answer! It never occurred to me to see it this way. – James Fennell May 23 at 17:12
  • I've also seen where one person's profile within a company was enough to elicit other employees to follow simply because they believed that there must be something better for them at this other company as well. – Joel Etherton May 23 at 18:01

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