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Summary: I knowingly trained my replacement at work, as I had a higher-level role but was expecting to leave due to other commitments (i.e. it wasn't a "ruse" by management, for example). I would like to know how, or if, I should represent this on a resume.


A couple of years ago, I was hired as a "summer student" in an Application Support (2nd tier support) role.

In due course I became very competent with my work and developed a strong relationship with my coworkers.

I then found out that one of the people 'John' who worked in first-tier support was out on long term disability, and also that the first-tier team were to be contracted out (outsourced). The company intended to move John into my role once he was able to return in a couple of years, since I was not expected to stay.

Close to the end of my term, I requested they extend me while John was still on leave, and they obliged. I ended up staying there until he returned, and spent the next two months training him until he could fulfil the role, after which my contract ended.

How would you describe this situation on a resume as a bullet under my previous job? I feel like the phrase "Trained employee responsible for taking these positions responsibilities" might bring into question why I'm no longer there, but there is no bad blood between my previous employer and I.

Clarifications: HelpDesk is considered first tier support, where our tickets come in and more trivial tasks can be completed. If they require higher privileges or helpdesk can not solve the issue they triage it to second tier. Application support is second tier support for all software based issues.

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    Mentoring. Call it mentoring, to give it the positive spin.
    – Jeffrey
    May 25, 2020 at 16:04
  • @Jeffrey So would "Mentored employee responsible for taking these positions responsibilities," or similar?
    – KGlasier
    May 25, 2020 at 16:05
  • Can you clarify what is the relationship (in that company) between first-tier support and applications support? Is applications support '2nd line' i.e. escalations from first-tier or is it functionally separate? May 25, 2020 at 18:38
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    @seventyeightist I’ve reflected the change in the post. But yes, that’s the relationship between the two.
    – KGlasier
    May 25, 2020 at 18:42
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    I proposed an edit to the question which you OP or someone else can accept (or not!) which I think will make it clearer for people to give answers. May 25, 2020 at 19:01

2 Answers 2

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Just don't mention it was your replacement you trained:

Eventually, I was tasked with training others in the responsibilities and activities of the role.

This single sentence helps to show that you had become competent enough to train other people, and it really didn't matter who you trained.

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Keep it short and to the point; if you assisted in mentoring and training your colleague(s) then state it that way. "I assisted in mentoring and training my colleague(s)."

A couple of years ago, I was hired as a "summer student" in an Application Support (2nd tier support) role.

Nobody you're interviewing with cares about how you got your previous job. Additionally, this isn't relevant to us or to the crux of your question.

In due course I became very competent with my work and developed a strong relationship with my coworkers.

This is good for the people you're interviewing to know, but it isn't relevant to us or to the crux of your question.

I then found out that one of the people 'John' who worked in first-tier support was out on long term disability, and also that the first-tier team were to be contracted out (outsourced). The company intended to move John into my role once he was able to return in a couple of years, since I was not expected to stay.

The people you're interviewing with don't need to know, and don't care, about the internal machinations of your previous employer. Additionally, it isn't relevant to us or to the crux of your question.

Close to the end of my term, I requested they extend me while John was still on leave, and they obliged. I ended up staying there until he returned, and spent the next two months training him until he could fulfill the role, after which my contract ended.

See my previous point.

How would you describe this situation on a resume as a bullet under my previous job? I feel like the phrase "Trained employee responsible for taking these positions responsibilities" might bring into question why I'm no longer there, but there is no bad blood between my previous employer and I.

This is the crux of your question. The answer is to state it simply and to the point. No other information or embellishment is needed.

"I helped train and mentor my colleague(s)"

Clarifications: HelpDesk is considered first tier support, where our tickets come in and more trivial tasks can be completed. If they require higher privileges or helpdesk can not solve the issue they triage it to second tier. Application support is second tier support for all software based issues.

See my previous points regarding this being irrelevant to the people you're interviewing and to us.

All that being said, people may think I'm being rude or mean spirited. I'm not. I'm making a point about making a point, and getting to the point. People, especially those you're interviewing with, have no time or patience for long windedness, wordiness, or for things that they frankly wouldn't understand about your previous employer and don't care about. You don't have to write a monologue about what and how things transpired. Keep your resume simple and to the point. Highlight the important facts. The details about how those facts came to be are irrelevant.

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  • How is it a "tome"? The background is described in 4 sentences and the current context in 2. Then the question itself, which is hardly overly wordy! May 25, 2020 at 20:09
  • It's 7 paragraphs for a question that can be asked in two sentences. It's not that complex. Q: I helped train and mentor my colleague(s). How should I list that on my resume?" A: "Say that you helped train and mentor your colleague(s)." - The rest of it is superfluous.
    – joeqwerty
    May 25, 2020 at 20:20
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    the first paragraph doesn't answer the question. If you want to comment on style, you should comment on the Q. May 25, 2020 at 20:32
  • Fine. I'm guilty of the same thing. I'll remove the first paragraph of my answer.
    – joeqwerty
    May 25, 2020 at 20:37
  • Thank you for the criticism. I'll keep it in mind for any further posts; however, I find a bit of context behind any question important as it can outline why someone asked the question in the first place. The summary at the top gives a concise description of what I was asking, followed by more detail if desired.
    – KGlasier
    May 25, 2020 at 20:41

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