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Recently I received an offer from company A. However, I am also waiting to hear back from company B, which would have higher salaries and benefits. Both places have interesting work.

Originally company B said that they expected to get back to me within 2 weeks, and for this reason, I delayed signing the final offer with company A (by making up excuses). However, company B has delayed this process for over a month now and the deadline for company A is fast approaching. When I reached out to company B, they claim that they are still interviewing other candidates with no end in sight. I told company B about the offer, to which they replied that I should postpone the offer from company A.

I'm inclined to accept the offer from company A. Is this decision wise? Thanks for all your feedback!

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    Company A is your only choice. – Michael McFarlane Jun 3 '20 at 0:09
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    This is something you'll have to figure out for yourself. We can't tell you if you should gamble. – Gregory Currie Jun 3 '20 at 0:14
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    I was in a similar situation a few months ago. Company A gave me an offer, at company B I had had 5 interviews and reference check. B kept calling me and promising they would decide "very soon". I wasn't interested in A, just B. Then B ghosted me. I haven't heard of them for the last 3 months. If A is acceptable, accept A. – BigMadAndy Jun 3 '20 at 2:00
  • Unless you are ready to take a huge risk and end up without any contract from both of the companies, I advise you to go for A. Maybe try to convince them to give you a higher salary, and even if they don't accept, I would go for them. So yes, that is the wise and less risky decision. – Doliprane Jun 3 '20 at 13:34
  • Thanks for everyone's feedback. In the end, I accepted offer A but didn't not tell B about it to see what would happen. In the end, company B did not make an offer after one more month. Needless to say, I was happy that I had opted for A. Had B offered later, I would still not have accepted it, I believe. – Astronomer Aug 20 '20 at 2:05
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Company B told you to postpone the offer from Company A, yet Company B is still interviewing candidates for the position?

That's disingenuous and in bad faith.

I'd accept the offer from Company A and tell Company B that you're no longer interested.

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    How is it disingenuous? How is it in bad faith? They want the best candidate. They are still interviewing. It's in their interests for candidates to be available. It would be in bad faith to say an offer will be made but without them knowing that to be true. But they are not saying that. – Gregory Currie Jun 3 '20 at 2:52
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    It's like asking one girl to not get a boyfriend until you decide if you want to go out with her or not but you're dating other girls to see if you like them better first. That's disingenuous and in bad faith. – joeqwerty Jun 3 '20 at 2:58
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    It's like telling a home seller not to accept any other buyer's offer because you might want to buy their house but you're still looking at other houses to see if you like them better. That's disingenuous and in bad faith. – joeqwerty Jun 3 '20 at 3:21
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    None of your examples are either disingenuous or in bad faith, provided that all parties are telling the truth and not misrepresenteing the situation. I don't think you know what those expressions mean. I think there is an assumption here that Company B is somehow obliged to give career advice. They are not. – Gregory Currie Jun 3 '20 at 5:00
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    Company B has told the OP not to accept the job offer from Company A, yet Company B has made no corresponding offer. Company A will likely choose another candidate for the job. Company B could very well offer the job to someone else. If the OP follows the direction of Company B, and if company B does not offer the job to the OP then the OP has no job offers. That's acting in bad faith. – joeqwerty Jun 3 '20 at 16:10
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I'm inclined to accept the offer from company A. Is this decision wise? Thanks for all your feedback!

Sorry, I don't understand why don't you take the offer from A while waiting for B? Surely, you can terminate the contract with A. Probation termination period is usually about 7 days. All you have to tell B (if they give you the offer) your notice period is 7 days.

If B has no offer, you do nothing. If they do, think of A like a short contract position. Your contract must have a clause that allows A (and yourself) to terminate the position for any reason.

... for over a month now ...

Perfect. Start working for A. Switch if you get another offer.

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    The fact that at the core you suggest that OP takes the job with plans to dump them ASAP needs a massive paragraph warning about burning bridges and how we we live in a small world where reputation about stuns like that spreads like wildfire. – Tymoteusz Paul Jun 3 '20 at 10:05
  • @TymoteuszPaul Company A has the power to terminate OP for any reason in probation. Lot's of people here on the forum have the experience not passing probation. Similarly, OP also has the power to do the same. This is called contracts. – QuantFinance Jun 3 '20 at 10:07
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    @TymoteuszPaul You're also assuming "small world". Our site guideline clearly state no assumption or guessing. Please read our FAQ or ask for mods help. We're here to answer based on question context not to guess. You don't know which two companies they are, and thus your comment is just wrong. I'm happy to help you finding the help page if you need. – QuantFinance Jun 3 '20 at 10:08
  • @TymoteuszPaul You also don't know the state of the positions. Maybe both jobs are short contracts? For example, decent mobile app development jobs are mostly short contract. Both remote positions? There are lots of unknowns not stated in the question, so you should not guess things as our mods may help you. – QuantFinance Jun 3 '20 at 10:25
  • @TymoteuszPaul workplace.stackexchange.com/questions/157809/… – QuantFinance Jun 4 '20 at 8:08

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