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I've been "found" by a company that needs a web developer, I was not looking for a job and my CV was not available anywhere as far as I know.

This company is a SUPER opportunity for my career development because I will be able to use bleeding-edge technology and my "future boss" is a super prepared person in all the tech aspects, he's a beast to be honest.

I've had several successful interviews already, and I've been invited to meet with the CEO, but this is the 3rd attempt to set up that meeting, previous attempts were via Zoom and were cancelled. Now they want me to attend in person.

I feel like they bailed me on those 2 previous meetings. I seriously can't imagine their workload because they're kind of starting as a company in the financial world: probably they had clients to attend to, setting up my salary budget, talking about the future of the company, COVID-19 shortages, etc.

Am I just trying to justify their acts or is it that I have such high hopes for this position that I might be falling in a trap?

I currently have a job, and they know that, I've been advised by several people to be patient because of the huge opportunity it might be for me.

I really want this job but not at least sending an email of "Hey we're sorry we couldn't make it to the meeting because of X and Y, we'll reschedule it if that's fine for you." pisses me off so much that I really consider answering this "Hey come meet in person the CEO" with a "Fade off" but that's so immature to be honest and I don't want to be unprofessional.

Please advise me.

  • Might it be that meeting in person is more "set in stone" that just a zoom call? I would ask about reimbursment if you need to spend money to attend that meeting and if you need to take day off at current work (of course if you will be stood up again). – SZCZERZO KŁY Jun 29 at 14:36
  • It will be a brief meeting I think and I can exchange my meal-time to assist, however I have a meeting in an hour after the meeting schedule they told me to assist and it will be a showcase / proof of concept of something I've been working on in this place, so I must leave it without flaws before I leave and omg I need to walk some stairs this whole situation is stressing – Napal Jun 29 at 14:40
  • Do you really want to work at a company that has bailed on you twice, without explanation or apology? That's very unprofessional behavior that shows you a hint of what your work day may be like. – Jay Jun 29 at 18:55
  • So when they cancelled the two previous appointments, they didn't say anything? Or...? – AakashM Jul 2 at 13:21
  • No until the last interview which already happened, I had much more to lose if I didn’t assist, everything was awesome and they did apologized – Napal Jul 2 at 13:25
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It looks like there is not much you're losing by going to the in-person interview.

In my experience, there is not much carrier advancement, being a "outsource" from placement company, you are always a resource.

In your current state - no offer / contract - you are not losing anything, same job and some potential job

if the company, that headhunted you is checked out as a actual one, why not giving it a chance?

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    This is what I've been feeling but couldn't find the words, these are the words, thanks a lot for the perspective – Napal Jun 29 at 15:29
  • @Napal My pleasure. good luck, keep us posted :) – Strader Jun 29 at 19:05
  • btw @Strader, losing is spelled "losing" in English - which is just one of those ridiculously strange English-spelling things if you're not a native English speaker, or you have a spell corrector which misses it every time! – Fattie Jun 30 at 15:08
  • @Fattie thank you for your comment, nice to know there are still people that will find what to write, even if they have nothing to add :) – Strader Jun 30 at 16:38
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Basically it comes down to this: Do you think the company is scamming you? Like, it's someone who is not really a company but they say they are in order to run some scam like getting money from you or something. Given that you have already had 3 interviews with this company, do you feel they are legit?

Rescheduling an interview twice when the interviewer is the CEO is not particularly uncommon. Is it a red flag? Yes, because it means you are not their top priority. Is it a big red flag? That depends on how reasonable you think the requests to reschedule are. Like, did the requests come just out of the blue, or did they give you some notice time to reschedule so you didn't have to take time off your regular job? Did they give a satisfactory explanation of the reason they needed to reschedule, or just say "we need to reschedule"?

If you think this company is good and you will enjoy your time more there, then I say go for it. As was said in the comments though, if you have any kind of expense to go to the interview, like taxi or expensive train or whatever, make sure to ask them to get reimbursed for it (I wouldn't ask them for reimbursement for like a local subway or something because that sounds kind of cheap). If they cancel on you a third time though, then I would definitely write them off as probably a scammer or something. In life as in baseball: Three strikes, you're out!

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  • They never said why they had to reschedule, they just kept sending the meetings with "Hey are you available at X hour, let's meet up in Zoom", I'll do my best to assist to the meeting today in person as I have nothing to lose, I really expect a reasonable comment about this tho, thanks for the answer I appreciate it – Napal Jun 29 at 15:05
  • @Napal That sounds like a schedule, not a reschedule. A reschedule is when you make a plan, and then someone involved in the plan cancels the plan and asks for another time. If they tried to schedule with you and you declined, that's your problem not theirs; if they tried to schedule with you and then THEY declined (after you accepted), that's something to look into. – Ertai87 Jun 29 at 16:19
  • They scheduled me at my shift hours to talk to them, I stopped working my shift and I was present the whole time they scheduled for me to talk, but they never showed up, I never scheduled anything with them, I've always adjusted my time and asked my current boss to allow me to eat at another hour, so instead of eating, I went to all these meeting where I was alone in front of the no other participant but me in the meeting, they never sent me an email of "Hey we're sorry we couldn't make it to the scheduled time we gave you, we'll be available this other day" – Napal Jun 29 at 16:45
  • That never happened, they just kept sending me meeting via email after 3 or 4 days to make another meeting where I did again, changed my meal-time in order to fit into their schedules where they bailed me over and over again, I was present in the meetings and they never reached me to apologize about it, they have been quite unprofessional IMO because imagine this, we're on a date, you're my date, I invite you to meet me at the cinema at 4PM but I dont show up, then a few days later I ask you out again and do the same thing, and for a third time you are all alone. It's frustrating... – Napal Jun 29 at 16:47
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    Did you ever tell them you would be able to talk at the times they suggested ? – Marianne013 Jun 29 at 18:16
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Never be weak

Your instinct is 100000% correct. If the other party is dicking you around, in any way, you have to stand up for yourself.

If you don't: you're always on the back foot in every future negotiation. Salary negotiations will go against you.

Be reasonable

At the same time, you've said that, in fact ... you pretty much really want the job in question.

Unfortunately then, they "have you over a barrel."

What's the language solution?

You have to respond in a way that is polite but has an edge; it has to be clear you are "putting up with them" - while still being polite.

Don't do this:

"Sure, any time, no problems at all, reschedule as often as you want, just let me know and I'll be there!"

Don't do this:

"That's pretty unprofessional. Can you please find a time we can stick to?"

What about this:

"Understood. I can't make 3 but would 4 be possible?"

Again be polite, professional, and brief. The feeling is that you are politely "putting up with their nonsense" because you are the "bigger professional".

Happy hunting!

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  • This insight empowers me lol, thanks for the sharing this – Napal Jun 30 at 15:48
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This would be my response to this 3rd attempt:

That sounds fine, but please text me one hour beforehand to confirm that your CEO will still be available for that one-on-one meeting with me. This way, if I don't hear from you. I'll assume that your CEO is busy and I'll know not to go.

Also, please note that I'll be on my lunch break and that I'll have to leave your meeting at 2 PM because I have another meeting afterward. I hope that one hour will be enough.

If you don't say this or something similar, mark my words, their CEO will flake on you again. And by flaking, I mean that either he won't be there or he'll be 15 to 30 minutes late.

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