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I recently had what I was told would be my final interview with a company. An executive, HR and the hiring manager were present, and salary was discussed.

About a week and a half went by, and then I received an email from HR inviting me to one last interview with the heads of two other departments, saying that they would like to get to know me because they would be working with me. They gave me no more detail than this. Previously my emails had been directly with the hiring manager.

How should I interpret this, and how should I prepare? Can I ask HR what the interview will be about?


UPDATE: I had the interview, and a week later was rejected due to my lack of experience in one of the areas represented by the people I spoke to in the final round. It was the nicest rejection I've ever received, however, with a lot of positive feedback!

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About a week and a half went by, and then I received an email from HR inviting me to one last interview with the heads of two other departments, saying that they would like to get to know me because they would be working with me. They gave me no more detail than this. Previously my emails had been directly with the hiring manager.

I've seen this happen when the hiring team couldn't come to a decision and opted for another interview to gather more information. There was another case where my team was hiring a senior cross-team and external facing role, but neglected to add adequate amount of stakeholders to the interview panel. When we went to extend an offer, another team voiced concern (respectfully) and we schedule another interview to accommodate. The candidate was eventually hired. It's hard to interpret exactly what's happening, but it sounds like the second case I described.

If your position is senior, cross-team and/or external facing, I don't see this as a red flag necessarily. If you're in an entry level role, it's unusual.

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    I've also seen this extra interview situation occur when a stakeholder (or stakeholders) had some sort of absence when the first round of interviews occurred - They were on sick leave, or on holiday, and the rest of the stakeholders didn't want to postpone the original set of interviews for them. – GenericMVCProgrammer Aug 13 at 18:40
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It reads more like they want to go play a round of golf with you more than it sounds like a serious interview. Shouldn't this be seen as an opportunity to find out if these are people you want to be working with as well?

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