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I currently have a "Senior" title with a company I am currently furloughed from and am looking for new opportunities as it is unlikely that I will be recalled with my company. While I have certain qualifications that let to me being offered a Senior title when being hired, they are not the typical expected qualifications for a Senior in my industry. I have a long history of freelance entertainment design work, a short but accomplished history in large-scale, full-time entertainment design for a major company, and an educational background+entry-level experience in architectural design.

As jobs in my specific sector are not available, I am looking for jobs in a parallel sector (entertainment vs architecture) that I do have a background in, just not Senior level and most people with my background are working as either Associate/Junior or Non-titled level. I feel like these missing qualifications and experience would be an issue if I were hired for another Senior position in a parallel industry.

Can/should I remove Senior from my resume and LinkedIn in this situation? Or do I leave it?

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    Do you know whether "senior" is considered meaningful in your industry? In software, it isn't trusted by itself because many people have inflated titles. I know devs who have 10 months of work experience with the "Senior Software Engineer" title, even at large companies. In my organization, "senior" is a management position. You can have 10 years of experience and your title is still "Software Engineer" – Matthew Gaiser Aug 20 '20 at 15:02
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    I believe that it is considered meaningful and comes with expectations of experience, completed projects, etc. – bobjenkins Aug 20 '20 at 15:48
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    Joe, can you please explain your thoughts? – bobjenkins Aug 20 '20 at 18:05
  • I don't include that at all. I let my work experience speak for itself. – dan-klasson Sep 1 '20 at 1:17
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Question is too broad. But on the other hand it really depends on job, field and which one of your aspects you want to emphasise. If you are applying for academia/legal/banking job it does not make sense to omit senior part. If you are sending CV for tech job however, "senior" can be huge setback for obvious reasons, unless you are going for narrower niche, e.g embedded or db management.

Include senior in title if position calls for experience, otherwise omit it because it may signify that one was working in same field too long.

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Senior title can leave you in big disadvantage (assuming you are in IT). Tech is rapidly evolving, what was relevant say, 3 years ago may not be relevant today, and "senior" title usually implies that you spent significant amount of your work life doing same thing. I am speaking from my own anegdotal experience, temprorarily worked few months in hiring/interviewing staff, when company ran out of cadres, and we had to reject big percentage of employees who didn't have diverse skillset and work experience. "Senior C developer with 10 years of experience" is sentence you really do not want in cv when job hunting these days.

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Can/should I remove Senior from my resume and LinkedIn in this situation? Or do I leave it?

There should be no issues removing it. "Senior" can have very different meanings across different companies. If you feel that having a senior title on your resume is limiting your potential employment opportunities then it would probably be best to omit it. Just keep in mind that most employers are looking primarily at your experience and skills rather than your previous title.

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    thank you for your perspective! – bobjenkins Aug 20 '20 at 18:04
  • It is certainly limiting job prospects in tech, outside of few very specific situations. – ImmortanJoe is censored and mu Aug 21 '20 at 18:54
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Several other questions specifically mention IT, which is not relevant to you since you are not in IT.

I am similarly in an industry where we have a fairly regular set of titles ("associate", "senior", "principal", et.). However, like you I also regularly apply to positions outside my current industry where those titles may be less easy to interpret. My experience has been that two things matter here:

  1. Your job title should clearly convey your skills and experience to the reader. If your title is "Senior Lighting Specialist" in your own company, are you prepared to gamble on someone in another company or industry understanding what makes a "senior" different from an "associate"? I wouldn't. It's better to use a description that makes more sense.
  2. Your job history claims should be defensible, because someone may check with prior employers. If your job title was, "Lighting Specialist III" but you describe yourself as "Lighting Supervisor" - will that claim stand up when someone checks your references? Your employer will probably provide a more exact title, but it should be clear that you are attempting to honestly describe what you do.

One nuance to consider is when your job titles show a clear sense of progression. For example, you worked for a theatre company where you spent 2 years as an "Associate Lighting Specialist", then were promoted and spent 3 years as a "Lighting Specialist". In this case, the duties and accomplishments on your resume serve to differentiate the different roles.

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If you want to avoid unnecessary friction when searching for job in tech then yes. Senior in your title is huge red flag from employers perspective as it tells about your inflexibility and preference for stability over taking risks ant thinking out of the box.

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    A "huge red flag"? In many industries like IT, anybody with more than a couple of years experience under their belt is "senior" -- and if they're in banking, they're all "vice presidents"! – lambshaanxy Sep 1 '20 at 2:44

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