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Long story short I am managing a team of software developers but I also manage our entire IT infrastructure. From our CAD systems to our database systems to our web servers to employee setups. Its a high level stressful job but I do it anyways. I have gone above and beyond in terms of IT but I have also been a key part of our sales team actually making the sale. We've been awarded multiple projects due to the requirements gathering, concept, and mockups I have delivered to the team.

My manager is not happy with the sales team, they also report to him as he is the CEO. I report directly to him as well. The sales team consists of another person who has an assistant. To me sales people need to be personable and should be able to persuade the customer. Our sales person lacks any of this but this is not my concern nor am I their boss.

In any event I asked for a raise recently because I am just going above and beyond what is being asked. My boss replied that he agrees however, he wants US to both think this through some more and now tie my pay increase to future projects. When I was hired in this was not in any contract or part of anything planned (I am in Michigan - USA). I do not think it is fair to suddenly tie my raise / bonus into future work and I simply do not want to wait any longer to get the go ahead on a pay increase.

I feel the CEO is just wasting time and trying to go around the issue at hand even though he agrees that my performance exceeds expectations and that I am due for a raise. How can I respond to this and tell him look thats all fine and dandy and maybe at a future time that can be put together but for now I'd like a salary increase.

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  • @JoeStrazzere - No my pay was not based on projects - the pay is simply for an IT manager to do IT work. Now I have involved myself with the analyst group and the sales groups only because I care and wanted to strengthen my skill set in the business. It was never tied to the project - I will say the sales team are structured like this but not any other department. We are mainly indirect. – JonH Aug 26 '20 at 18:35
  • @JoeStrazzere - That is not my point, I don't mind tying a raise to my pay but that was not the plan from day one nor should it suddenly be a plan just because I asked for a raise. If that is the case great let my CEO figure it out but I still want my raise for my current work ethics, the current work I have done now and throughout the past couple of years. – JonH Aug 26 '20 at 18:42
  • @JoeStrazzere - this was mentioned today hence my question. I ended up accepting the answer below and used this method to discuss with him, lets see what happens. – JonH Aug 26 '20 at 23:18
  • some of the behaviors you're describing might be cause for requesting a promotion to accompany a raise as well. I'm not sure if your company has positions for senior managers or not. This is a good opportunity to consider what that kind of advancement means in your company. – Joel Etherton Aug 27 '20 at 13:21
  • If he is going to tie it to future work then you need to demand to be a contractor and be paid a contractors hourly rate. – NDEthos Aug 28 '20 at 13:29
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As I understand you still in the middle of negotiation as nothing has been finalized.

Why don't you suggest to your boss to break a raise in to two parts

  1. Immediate permanent raise in your regular salary for job well done and all the efforts you've put in.
  2. % of each future project company will be working on

If you cannot get any current increase, in my opinion it would indicate lack of CEO's interest to keep you, or his belief that you have no options.

Perhaps in that case you should try looking outside for a similar position with less stress and more pay / benefits

From my experience, there is always a better offer, especially if you haven't been on a market for a few years. (Hard to find quality personnel these days (c) as one of the friends told me)

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    I like this answer... – JonH Aug 26 '20 at 18:42
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    This answer seems like a constructive and beneficial approach for OP... on a really objective and factual analysis, OP is already doing many things and has many responsibilities. I doubt that OP's boss is in a position to let them go now. We could say that OP has a vantage point on that aspect: they are doing a great job, deserve a raise, and letting OP go is something that is not beneficial for Boss now... – DarkCygnus Aug 26 '20 at 21:28
  • This answer makes an uninformed assumption about the CEO's intent or mindset that is prejudicial. There may be many more reasons for not being able to offer the raise that have nothing to do with their impression of OP or desire to retain. – Joel Etherton Aug 27 '20 at 13:18
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    @JoelEtherton We can only comment on information, provided by OP. in this context CEO's response is looking like a dodge or a stall. my suggestion should help OP to get a clear understanding of CEO`s intentions. – Strader Aug 27 '20 at 14:53
  • @Strader: You've made my point exactly. "Looking like" is a complete assumption. Your suggestion actually predetermines an "understanding" rather than looking truly to understand. – Joel Etherton Aug 27 '20 at 15:17
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How can I respond to this and tell him look thats all fine and dandy and maybe at a future time that can be put together but for now I'd like a salary increase.

You already asked for a salary increase and even though he seemingly agreed that you are doing good work he did not give you the salary increase. This means that either he:

  • Doesn't really value the work you are doing.
  • Cannot afford to increase your salary now.
  • Can afford to increase your salary now, but is being cheap.

None of these possibilities bode well for you. I would seriously re-consider whether you want to continue working for this company.

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  • +1 but i think there may still be better answers I really think he does in fact value my work greatly - the customers have expressed this to him on several occasions. I think hes more on the cheap side. – JonH Aug 26 '20 at 18:07
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    Cheap is not fixable – Tymoteusz Paul Aug 26 '20 at 18:17
  • @JonH you want a better answer explaining "cheap"? really?? Either you read, reflect and react or stay shtum... – Solar Mike Aug 26 '20 at 18:58
  • @SolarMike - be professional no one said that, lets not assume he is cheap 100% I said "I think'. I want to leave it open for some more answers and one came through that makes sense - a middle ground. – JonH Aug 26 '20 at 19:02
  • @JonH bullet point 3 clearly mentions "cheap". – Solar Mike Aug 26 '20 at 19:04
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I feel the CEO is just wasting time and trying to go around the issue at hand even though he agrees that my performance exceeds expectations and that I am due for a raise.

He is.

How can I respond to this and tell him look thats all fine and dandy and maybe at a future time that can be put together but for now I'd like a salary increase.

Be direct, much the way you have here. There is no point doing otherwise it just creates room for pretend misunderstanding and further negotiation.

Not part of the question, but depending on your industry and location, now might not be the best time to push too hard. A lot of people are recently unemployed Worldwide and many businesses are suffering badly. Strongarming during a difficult period won't be forgotten. So it's a judgement call.

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"Well, have you yet engineered a 'tangible downside?'"

Any alternative scenario which could cause him or her ... "business pain?"

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