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I had an interview with a company yesterday. Today, when I wanted to ask the HRs for my interviewer's email address so I can send a thank-you note to them, both HRs that I've been in contact with during the process are out of the office until Tuesday due to Labor Day. So it is not likely that I will be able to send a thank you note until next Tuesday as I can't find their contact information anywhere.

Questions: Will a late thank-you note received as insincerely? If not, should I explain why I sent it late when I decide to send it? If yes, is there still a point of sending them then?

Additional note:

This is also a company that often not respond to the candidates in case of a rejection, so I mainly wanted to use a thank-you note as an opportunity to express my interest in this role and potentially asking for the next step of the process.

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Will a late thank-you note received as insincerely? If not, should I explain why I sent it late when I decide to send it? If yes, is there still a point of sending them then?

Being grateful and showing it is never insincere or unprofessional; better late than never.

I don't think it's necessary to excuse yourself as it would only be a few days that passed since the interview.

However, if you feel compelled to do so, do it briefly. A phrasing I suggest could be:

Hello, [names]. I just got your contact email and wanted to thank you for the interview opportunity. [the rest of what you want to say]

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Questions: Will a late thank-you note received as insincerely? If not, should I explain why I sent it late when I decide to send it? If yes, is there still a point of sending them then?

It probably will not be seen as insincere, but I would avoid sending it late altogether.

Send the thank you note to the HR person that arranged the interview for you. Thank both the HR person as well as the interviewer in your email. You should mention that since you do not have the interviewer's contact information you would appreciate it if the HR person passes along your thank you message to them.

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  • I upvoted because it's a viable option. However, this is more likely to work for a generic thank you, but not if OP was planning to sort of continue a conversation in the email, e.g. by referencing a problem that was discussed in the interview. (Although, even in that case, HR could forward the email.) – Llewellyn Sep 4 '20 at 18:55

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