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I currently work in the higher education space and recently got an adjunct faculty position (through my current position, for a semester). This teaching position runs from August to December. I have also earned an advanced degree while in my current position and, honestly, I'm starting to feel like I'm overqualified for this position.

Recently, I saw a job posting within the same organization that fits my desired career path and I'm torn between applying for the job or staying.

While my current position will not try to stop me if I decide to leave, I'm trying to find a scenario where I'm pursuing my career goals while at the same not step on toes on my way out, and complete my teaching obligations till the end of the current Fall semester.

So, my questions are:

  1. At what point do I bring this up with my current supervisor?

  2. I want to be as discreet as possible, but, also put forward my best references, which includes my current supervisor. How many I go about this?

These are the questions I have at the moment.

I'll be happy to provide more background if I need to.

Updates.

The current job I hold is a full-time position, but, I also took the teaching position in a temporary capacity. The teaching will end in December, but the full time position is not ending when the teaching ends. I started the full-time position in 2017, and teaching this past August.

The job I'll looking for has just been posted two days ago and it will be opened until they find someone. I have not applied to it yet.

Yes, I have other references that I can reach out to.

I did not sign any notice period forcing me to stay at my current position.

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Recently, I saw a job posting within the same organization that fits my desired career path and I'm torned between applying for the job or staying.

Don't sacrifice your career aspirations and dreams! Yes, you should be professional and fulfill your duties to your best, but don't feel bound to a job forever if you see and feel there is something better for you.

At what point do I bring this up with my current supervisor?

I want to be as discreet as possible, but, also put forward my best references, which includes my current supervisor. How many I go about this?

Seems that you already accepted/committed to this temporary position. In this case you already took the other job, and ditching it now for this opportunity would not be the best course of action. I will edit my answer when you provide feedback but in general terms this is what I suggest you do:

  1. Apply to the dream job ASAP. Try to advance on the process as much as you can without compromising your current job(s) and before they ask for references or the process turns more serious.

  2. If you get rejected forget the idea and continue normally.

  3. If the application seems promising, then you should proceed to tell your supervisor about this. Making it clear that you want to fulfill your responsibilities the best you can in the meantime (for the rest of the semester perhaps?), and also politely asking them to be a reference for you.

  4. Continue and finish the process, get an offer, accept it. Simultaneously, work with your supervisor on a course of action that would be graceful for the parts involved (don't know if this means that someone will have to cover some of the courses when you leave or similar).

Update:

Given the fact that you have other references you could use and that you have no Notice Period or obligation signed then I would suggest you don't list your supervisor as reference.

Use your other contacts as references (after asking them of course) and continue with the process even further. When getting an offer seems imminent then it would still be professional to tell your supervisor in advance, so they can sort out the aspects that will come with you leaving your current job(s).

Even though you didn't agreed on a Notice period, the "professional standard" in many parts of the world is to give a 2 week notice regardless. It's the professional and polite thing to do.

You can give a longer period if you want to be extra careful not to burn any bridges or "step in any toes" on your way out, but whatever you do only do it when you have received and accepted an offer (signed it, printed copy etc.).

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  • Thanks for the response. I updated my question as per your comment questions. – hello Sep 9 '20 at 23:40
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    @hello updated my answer. Good luck with your endeavors :) – DarkCygnus Sep 9 '20 at 23:51

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