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So the story is: I started the coding career for a bit less than 2 years. Recently I've been job hunting for quite a while, and there is a company who's willing to offer me a job, which is great.

The company was initially going to offer me, for what I think, at least £3k more than normally someone with my level of experience. Then yesterday the recruiter called me and told me that the company really liked me and thought I performed really well in the interview, so they increased the salary for £3k more (per year, same below), which makes it £6k more than market average (again, for someone with my level of experience, I think).

Now I'm concerned about this offer: is it normal that the company offers this much? I may have performed really good in the interview but would they want a candidate so badly that they increased the salary by themselves knowing I was already happy with the first offered salary? This all seems too good to be true?

Also, with this high salary, would a company expect the employee to perform extremely well and if the employee does not fulfil this, would they just fire the employee?

  • £3k more per month or year? – FooTheBar Oct 6 '20 at 9:35
  • @FooTheBar Per year, I'll update the question – thinkvantagedu Oct 6 '20 at 9:35
  • @JoeStrazzere yes, it's the above average salary and the 2nd offer without me asking concerns me. – thinkvantagedu Oct 6 '20 at 11:08
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    It's entirely possible this company has lost the last few candidates due to not being competitive in salary at their original valuation. They may be willing to go higher so as not to miss out on yet another candidate. I have recently lost some folks on one of my teams to salary offers different by 30K+. We're having to go back to the position and completely re-evaluate the skillsets and valuation. – Joel Etherton Oct 6 '20 at 15:40
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    @JoelEtherton is right. Some companies have "turnover trauma" and attempt to increase their retention rates by offering higher salary. I've seen it happen even in companies with decent management and culture. It's easier to do this at entry-level jobs, since salaries are cheaper and junior employees are more easily swayed by money (seniors will demand flexible schedule or other benefits). They don't expect you to "perform extremely well", they just want you to do your job (and not to quit). – Ramon Melo Oct 6 '20 at 22:39
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Now I'm concerned about this offer: is it normal that the company offers this much?

An average isn't a single number. There is a range. Also the the amount a particular company will pay can depend on their exact location, and their exact requirements.

We see many questions on this site comparing their pay to the average. The problem is that they are many sources for the average, and no way to understand how and why they differ.

I may have performed really good in the interview but would they want a candidate so badly that they increased the salary by themselves knowing I was already happy with the first offered salary?

Some companies have well defined ranges they will pay based on specific criteria. It is possible that your expertise/experience allowed you to qualify for that higher range. They also may have recently decided to bump up the pay for that position because they lost current employees and other qualified candidates for similar positions over the pay they were offering.

Their need to fill your position quickly can also lead a company to bump the offer to make you decide quickly.

This all seems too good to be true?

Only you can judge that.

Also, with this high salary, would a company expect the employee to perform extremely well and if the employee does not fulfill this, would they just fire the employee?

If you struggle more than they expect they may let you go during the probation period. If you aren't a superstar they may limit your increases in future years which would allow the average to catch up to your salary over time.

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If you are as good as your CV says and the interview results show then they should be getting a bargain.

They may have a pressing need for your skills and what you to start as soon as possible.

If they find out that you don’t have the abilities you stated on your CV then they may well decide not to keep you, one of the reasons for a probationary period.

Sounds like you have a good post lined up, best of luck.

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I have had colleagues which changed jobs - and they claimed they received double salary at the new job.

Myself: One of the job changes brought me a really huge increase of salary (I choose to not be specific ;) ).

So the £3k increase is surely significant, but still not really a reason to freak out - especially that it is per year and not per month.

If there are no other red flags, take it and be happy.

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