0

During a performance review, I pointed out to my manager’s boss and HR the bad practices my manager. The bad practices eventually lead to the low quality and delay of the project, but the issue was blamed on me by the manager because i was project lead.

Manager’s boss and HR, asked me why I did not report the bad practices to them beforehand. To which, “I answered that he was the manager and those were his chosen methods. I pointed out the issues to the manager, yet he superseded me to make way for the on-time delivery of the project.”

Manager’s boss and HR instead said that I am still to blame because of my actions.

Are they right? Should I have been more assertive and reported the manager immediately? Is there a correct answer here?

2

These situations are usually lose-lose. Whatever you do, they have a reason to hurt you. Additionally (unfortunately) there is no easy way out of this, without leaving the company.


The bright side

If the company is not rotten "by definition", then it might help you to report project problems (and there solutions as you see them) to higher management. If they decide tho go ahead, then your manager cannot supersede them. Worst case, if your manager is not at all cooperating, try to have a face-to-face meeting with his manager. Be ready to have proofs of al your claims - ideally as mail communications or similar. Just spoken words are not enough.


During a performance review, I pointed out to my manager’s boss and HR the bad practices my manager.

If you did exactly that, than you pretty much hurt yourself. NEVER EVER tell bad things about managers!! ESPECIALLY not in official meetings. NEVER trust HR to be your friend. They are paid by the managers, not by yourself. Be extra politically correct about everything you say. Even when you say something bad (especially about a manager) make it sound like it is something good.


Right now, you cannot do much to change your performance evaluation review. You pretty much gave 2 choices:

  1. (professionally preferred) Swallow it and continue doing your job. In the meanwhile, improve your reports, your project management style, and your abilities in company politics.

  2. (last resort) Find a better job. DO NOT TELL anything bad about your previous bosses during the interview!!! Just serve them the "new professional opportunities to learn and grow" story.


Are they right? Should I have been more assertive and reported the manager immediately? Is there a correct answer here?

They are right and they are wrong at the same time.

They are right that you should have protected your project better. You should have escalated earlier.

They are wrong to find you as the only scape goat. But that is company politics. Employees are disposable. Managers are critical assets. Even though the reality is usually reversed.

3
  • Thank you very much. I feel uplifted a little. I just really love the project and put a lot of effort unto it. I guess I feel hurt that those effort was disregard, specially when I manage to save the company a few thousand dollars and those were not even considered during the review. I did not experience this before in previous companies, thats why I responded that way. I thought that was right and have no experience in office politics. I cannot resign because of mycontract. But your answer made me hopeful and less burdened. Thank you very much again, Oct 13 '20 at 8:31
  • can you give example on how to do this? “Even when you say something bad make it sound like it is something good”. Oct 13 '20 at 11:18
  • It really depends on the situation, and on the people. An also on your imagination :) One way could be: "Boss suggested this great (bad idea), and to improve it, we can do (your idea)." Basically, you say something nice about the boss, while throwing his idea (or decision) to the garbage. Just be careful, it cannot be used in any situation, as I already said.
    – virolino
    Oct 13 '20 at 11:56

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .